Villa Julie petitions board to overturn enrollment limit BALTIMORE COUNTY

August 07, 1993|By Patrick Gilbert | Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer

Villa Julie College has asked the Baltimore County Board of Appeals to reconsider its decision to uphold its cap on future student enrollment and a limit on the amount of waste water discharged from a proposed treatment plant.

Villa Julie had filed for a special zoning exception that would allow it to expand its institution in an agricultural zone. County Zoning Commissioner Lawrence E. Schmidt granted the exception but limited future enrollment at the school to 5 percent a year up to a total of 2,500 students over a five-year period. He also limited the discharge from a proposed waste-water treatment plant to 50,000 gallons a day. The plant is needed to handle the expansion.

A petition filed by Benjamin Bronstein, the college's attorney, said the board's action was "unsupported by both testimony and evidence" in seven days of hearings on the case.

The college appealed the limitations set by Mr. Schmidt, while the Valleys Planning Council and several landowners appealed the special zoning exception approval.

Two weeks ago, the Board of Appeals issued an opinion upholding both limitations.

Either side in a case may appeal to the county Circuit Court or petition the board to reconsider within 30 days of the board's opinion.

The board may decide to hear arguments on the petition for reconsideration, or grant or deny the request.

Villa Julie College, a 46-year-old private institution in the Greenspring Valley with a current enrollment of 1,700 students, wants to add 98,000 square feet of classrooms, laboratories and study areas.

The County Council has given the college approval to build a treatment plant, and the state approved a permit to allow the plant to discharge up to 60,000 gallons a day.

Last week, the state Water Resources Administration approved the college's request to use up to 60,000 gallons a day of ground water.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.