Chess lovers make moves

SYLVIA BADGER

July 25, 1993|By SYLVIA BADGER

It was certainly the love of the game, not the prize money, that attracted 45 people to play in the first summer Maryland Arts Festival Chess Championship Tournament at Towson State University. (The tournament was inspired by Tim Rice's rock musical, "Chess," which is appearing at the university through July 31.)

Thanks to sponsors like Eddie's Supermarket, What's Your Game? and Border's Book Shop, gift certificates ranging from $20 to $75 were given to winners -- jazz musician Charles Covington, Stouffer hotel employee Boris Zisman, computer programmer Alexander Rozental, Towson State student Paul Nesterovsky, research mathematician Terence Coffee, University of Maryland student Andrew Hervert, teacher Mark Duncovich, and Calvert School student Allan Peacock.

Many of the players stayed for a barbecue dinner and to see "Chess," which was inspired by the 1972 chess match between American Bobby Fischer and Russian Boris Spassky. For ticket information, call (410) 830-ARTS.

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Canada and the mythical 100th anniversary of the hockey puck set the theme for "Turkey Joe" and Sherry Trabert's annual "Summer Salute to the Nations" party.

While the Traberts served Moosehead beer and hamburgers (which, you must admit, do look a bit like hockey pucks, anyway). Audrey Lane tickled the ivories for electrician Lou Hinkle, who sang Canadian ditties. Guests were encouraged to bring their favorite covered dishes, so WQSR's Linda Sherman fixed her signature dish of chocolate wafers, Cool Whip and raspberry sauce, only to be outdone by grilled codfish cakes a la Mike Szimanski, Maryland Media Associates.

Others who honored the occasion were Carolyn and Stu Hyatt, dressed as hockey players; Kathy McAllen as Anne of Green Gables, and "Baseball Billy" and Mo Jones.

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Former WFBR-radio general manager Harry Shriver had been working (to no avail) with the new owners of WHLP, 1360 on the AM dial, to secure the more identifiable WFBR call letters for the station.

But Hoppy Adams, a former WANN-on air personality, has claim to the call letters and is still trying, after five years, to get a station on the air in Cambridge. If that happens, he wants WFBR as his call letters. Meanwhile, WHLP is becoming WWLG, and the station's new slogan is "Legends 1360," indicating they will play the music of American's legendary singers and bands.

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Talked to Judy Matte, wife of former Colts player Tom Matte, who is spending her summer helping David Julian of the Greater Baltimore Committee and Ernie Accorsi of the Maryland Stadium Authority.

They're coordinating advance sales of sky boxes for the new stadium that will be built if Baltimore lands an NFL franchise this fall. Sales have already been brisk: Only 30 sky boxes are left to sell out of a proposed 100. Prices begin at $45,000 and go up to $105,000.

Call Judy at (410) 727-2820 for more information, or Carol Salmon, (410) 333-1560, to buy club seats.

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All-Star week brought big business and big names to area eateries. Among those who ate at Hersh's Orchard Inn in Towson were Earl Weaver, former Orioles manager; Roy Firestone, ESPN; Tom Selleck, film star; Mr. and Mrs. Tom Clancy -- he's the well-known Maryland author; Jamie Reed, Baltimore O's trainer; Ron Sandberg, Chicago Cubs All-Star; Al Kaline, Detroit Tigers; Bobby Grich, former Oriole; and Mr. and Mrs. Chuck Thompson -- he's Baltimore's All-Star sports announcer.

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Around town: There was a little excitement, but the 1993-1994 officers of the Advertising Association of Baltimore (AAB) have been elected. The new president, Barbara Blum, Blum Group, survived a challenge by Jack Gilden, Cornerstone Agency, who joined AAB in March. Other officers are first vice president Graham Kirk, Gray Kirk/VanSant, who I'm told is also first in Barbara's personal life; second vice president Nancy Hill, W. B. Doner & Co; secretary Steve Pasierb, State of Maryland; and treasurer Janice Davis, Mercantile Bank . . . And kudos to the Sheraton Baltimore North, a hotel with a heart that has donated more than 400 bedspreads to area homeless shelters and community assistance centers.

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