A feast of memorabilia is served up at FanFest

July 10, 1993|By Ruth Sadler | Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer

At Upper Deck All-Star FanFest, collectors will see a lot of memorabilia -- of baseball's past, international baseball, the minor leagues -- and they'll be able to see memorabilia being made.

The exhibit is called Making of the Game, and Major League Baseball licensees will make items fans can buy, everything from baseball equipment to souvenir T-shirts.

Rawlings will be making bats, gloves and balls. Wilson will be making balls.

Curious about how spiked shoes are made? See Nike. Russell will demonstrate uniform-making. Balfour will show off its All-Star rings -- and allow fans to order one.

Salem Sportswear will be making commemorative All-Star T-shirts, and fans can watch them being made before they buy them. The shirt front shows eight or nine players drawn in cartoon style, and the back has the game rosters. Shirts will be sewn and then printed. This is Salem's fourth event (it has been to the Super Bowl, NBA All-Star Game and NCAA basketball Final Four) but the first time it will have people putting the shirts together.

At the New Era exhibit, fans can watch sweatbands and labels being attached to caps and the top-stitching applied. Fans who stop by will receive an All-Star Game sweatband label, and New Era will apply the labels for fans who purchase caps.

Cooperstown Bat Co. will be making All-Star Game mini-bats, which purchasers can have personalized.

There's free memorabilia at All-Star Bazaar, where many licensees will be handing out promotional cards and other collectibles. Collectors will recognize Upper Deck, Topps, Fleer Score, Kenner Starting Lineup and Hartland, but they'll also find Fruit of the Loom and Dial.

Nearby is All-Star FanFest Baseball Cards, where fans can get a unique souvenir -- their own Donruss baseball card. There are caps and jerseys from five teams -- Orioles, Braves, Phillies, Rockies and Marlins -- and fans can have their card made up as a member of their favorite team. Cards have stats on the back, and they're free. But be warned -- the lines are long.

Collectors can really get into Fleer cards. There will be several giant cards with cut-out heads so fans can be photographed as baseball stars.

Collector's Showcase is FanFest's baseball card show. Besides card dealers, there are collector-oriented businesses such as Scoreboard, Beckett and Chicagoland Processing/Environmint. Scoreboard Memories will put your name in lights on a photograph of the scoreboard at your favorite major-league ballpark, except Dodger Stadium.

Ted Williams Card Co. will be premiering its cards here, and Williams is scheduled to appear at the company booth tomorrow.

Hologram collectors can check out 3D4U's Camden Yards cards, which get their premiere at FanFest. There were 50,000 produced. Wayne Pohlman has them at the Wayne's Baseball Cards booth in Collector's Showcase.

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