Columbia under-19 girls fall in U.S. Youth regionals, 2-0

SOCCER

July 04, 1993|By Gary Davidson | Gary Davidson,Contributing Writer

LAWRENCEVILLE, N.J. -- Sarah Dacey scored on a penalty kick in the 28th minute and Lori Penny added an insurance goal midway through the second half yesterday as the Greater Boston Bolts beat the Columbia Crusaders, 2-0, in the girls under-19 semifinals of the United States Youth Soccer Region I Championships at Rider College.

The Bolts will play VISTA United of Fairfax, Va., in today's title match. VISTA eliminated the defending Eastern Regional under-19 champ Willingboro (N.J.) Strikers, 2-1, in overtime.

Laurie Greer started the sequence that led to the Bolts' deciding goal with a cross to Amy Burrill, who drilled a 10-yard shot into the chest of sweeper Jackie Rieschick. Rieschick, standing on the goal line near her left post, caught the ball. A penalty kick was awarded and Rieschick ejected with a red card for intentionally handling a ball to prevent a goal. Columbia was left one player short for the remaining 62 minutes.

Dacey, a U.S. under-20 national team member, sent her penalty low and hard into the right side of the net just beyond the outstretched hands of diving goalkeeper Amy Moxley.

"I just reacted quickly. I didn't have time to think," said Rieschick, a Hammond High graduate who played last fall for George

Washington University. "I couldn't get my head on it. My first instinct was to save a goal. I regret it now."

Penny scored on a low 25-yard shot just inside the left post to finish the scoring.

The Crusaders have won seven straight age-group Maryland Cups, including the past three U-19 crowns. The Bolts have captured seven consecutive under-19 Massachusetts State Cups.

In a girls under-15 semifinal, the Braddock Road Astros of Fairfax, Va., beat the Columbia Spirit, 3-1.

The Massapequa (N.Y.) Sting defeated the Baltimore Strikers,

6-0, in a girls under-13 semifinal.

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