Would-be canoe thieves collared

ARRESTS ARE FIRST FOR TOLLIVER'S SON

June 29, 1993|By David Michael Ettlin | David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer

The son of Maryland's state police superintendent made his first arrests yesterday as a cadet with the Natural Resources Police, collaring a juvenile gang of would-be canoe thieves in his own Admiral Heights neighborhood in Annapolis.

Cadet Perry Tolliver, 21, said he was driving from the Natural Resources Police academy on Kent Island to his family's home on Dewey Drive about 4:30 p.m. when he noticed six teen-agers at the Admiral Heights community dock, where there has been an outbreak of vandalism and theft.

After arriving home, the cadet called his dispatcher for help. "I saw them messing around with the canoe. I knew it wasn't theirs," Cadet Tolliver said.

The 16-foot Coleman canoe is owned by a next-door neighbor whose powerboat was damaged by thieves June 2, police said.

Two Natural Resources corporals, Joseph Offer and Wayne Jones, arrived to help the cadet catch the youths, who left the canoe in the creek and fled on foot.

Cadet Tolliver said a neighbor across the street pointed out a driveway where the youths had run.

"Me and Corporal Offer pulled up on one driveway. Corporal Jones pulled up to another driveway. That's when the kids broke and ran on us. I ran back to the car to call for backup and drove around the block and saw two of the kids coming from behind a neighbor's house. I made a motion for them to stop, and they stopped."

Others were captured a few minutes later in woods nearby by another officer. The youths, ages 13 to 16, were being questioned by police last night.

Cadet Tolliver said most of the neighborhood's recent crime problems involved thefts of boats or items from them.

The arrests made him "a hero of the neighborhood" yesterday, the cadet acknowledged, adding that his father, Col. Larry W. Tolliver, was proud of him -- and that was more important.

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