Votes In Congress

June 20, 1993|By Roll Call Report Syndicate

Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week:

YES N: NO X: NOT VOTING

HOUSE: STRIKER REPLACEMENT

By a vote of 237 for and 151 against, the House sent the Senate a bill (HR 5) to prohibit employers from hiring permanent replacements for workers who are striking over economic issues or working conditions. The bill is the AFL-CIO's top legislative priority and is opposed by business groups such as the National Association of Manufacturers.

A yes vote supported the bill.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: AID TO RUSSIA

By a vote of 140 for and 289 against, the House rejected an amendment to eliminate $1.6 billion for Russia from a bill (HR 2295) appropriating more than $13 billion in U.S. economic, military and humanitarian aid to countries around the globe.

Conservative backers of the amendment said Russian aid should be conditioned on Moscow advancing U.S. interests in hostile nations like Cuba, and collateralized by Russia's mineral wealth. Many liberals objected to helping Russia at the expense of important social initiatives at home.

A yes vote was to strip $1.6 billion in Russian aid from a fiscal 1993-94 foreign aid bill.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: FOREIGN AID

By a vote of 246 for and 186 against, the House derailed an attempt to terminate the Agency for International Development in September 1994 and then distribute U.S. aid through a new structure to the 50 countries where it best serves American interests. The vote during debate on HR 2404 instead gave the administration 60 days to propose its own overhaul of the Agency for International Development.

A yes vote opposed terminating the Agency for International

Development.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Morella, Constance A., R-8th

SENATE: CAMPAIGN FINANCE

By a vote of 60 for and 38 against, the Senate sent the House a bill (S 3) providing the first overhaul of congressional campaign financing since the aftermath of Watergate two decades ago. The measure seeks to lessen the influence of special-interest money on decision-making and reduce the considerable time most incumbents spend chasing that money.

In part, the bill sets voluntary spending limits on Senate campaigns based on state population, requires lower broadcast rates for campaign commercials and bans contributions by political action committees (PACs) and lobbyists. Candidates would receive public funds, to subsidize communications costs, only in cases where they accept and their opponent rejects spending limits. The public funding would be raised through a new tax on campaign revenues of candidates rejecting spending limits (next issue).

1% A yes vote was to pass the bill.

N X Member Y N X Member

Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Sarbanes, Paul S., D

SENATE: COMPROMISE AMENDMENT

The Senate adopted, 52 for and 47 against, an amendment that cleared the way for passage of long-filibustered campaign finance reform legislation (S 3). The amendment killed a plan for substantial public funding of most congressional campaigns, financed by ending lobbyists' business deductions. Instead, it provides scaled-down public funding available only to candidates abiding by spending limits while their opponents spurn the limits. The funding would come from a new 35 percent tax on the gross campaign receipts of those candidates who reject spending limits.

3' A yes vote supported the amendment.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Sarbanes, Paul S., D

SENATE: FREE TELEVISION

The Senate rejected, 32 for and 66 against, an amendment to S 3 (above) providing free television time to congressional candidates who accept campaign spending limits. Broadcasters were to have received a tax deduction enabling them to partially recoup lost revenue.

A yes vote was to require broadcasters to provide free time to candidates.

Y N X Member Y N X Member

Mikulski, Barbara A., D

Sarbanes, Paul S., D

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