When Ephron met B'more

SYLVIA BADGER

June 13, 1993|By SYLVIA BADGER

Writer-director Nora Ephron, who wrote the scripts for "Silkwood," "When Harry Met Sally," and "Heartburn," will be in town this week for an exclusive, invitation-only screening of her new movie, "Sleepless in Seattle," at the Senator Theatre. This romantic comedy, partially shot in Maryland, is a Tri-Star production starring Tom Hanks as a widower and Meg Ryan as a Baltimore Sun reporter.

Ephron will be the guest of the Producers Club of Maryland, a foundation set up to support and enhance Maryland's film industry. Its membership is impressive and includes Jed Dietz, Film Partners Ltd.; Blair Barton, publisher of the Maryland-D.C. Production Guide; Edwin Warfield, Daily Record/Warfield's magazine; Debbie Smith, Tremont Hotel; Celia Blumenstein, Budget-Rent-A-Car; David Cordish, a developer whose son recently won the UCLA film prize for an original 20-minute screenplay; Jim Dale, W. B. Donor; Gail Kaplan, Classic Catering People; Stuart Cooper, producer; Mark Rosen, attorney; Donald Rothman, attorney; Tom Kiefaber, owner of the Senator; and Jay Schlossberg-Cohen, who recently resigned as director of the Maryland Film Commission to follow his first love -- painting. No word yet on who will replace him.

If the foundation has its way, Maryland will become one of the places to make or premiere films. There are plans to visit Los Angeles, where members will interact with producers, directors, writers and film stars who have Baltimore connections. Gus Blackmon, Warner Bros; John Hendricks, president of the Discovery Channel; Rick Hess, Pleskow/Spikings; Mark Johnson and Barry Levinson, Baltimore Pictures; Marc Platt, Tri Star; Jim Robinson, Morgan Creek Productions; Tom Sherak, 20th Century, are among the show biz names committed to helping the foundation.

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Hitting 50 was a turning point for Baltimore attorney Stephen L. Miles. That's when he decided that after 22 years of practicing law, it was time to pursue a few of the fun things he'd always wanted to do.

Since he'd been told he was funny and did have acting exposure with his "Let's Talk About It" television ads, he enrolled in the Stand Up Comedy Workshop in New York City.

Recently, he made his debut with a five-minute act at Caroline's, a comedy club in New York.

Miles says that performing before a live audience who had actually paid to get in was truly exciting. Now that he's done a New York gig, he's checking into performing at a Baltimore

comedy club.

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Michael Hodes, who wears many hats as an attorney, financial adviser and radio talk show host, has added another feather to his cap as one of the owners of WHLP, 1360 AM, a 5,000-watt Baltimore station.

Changes have been swift at the station, which hopes to change its call letters to WFBR. If that doesn't work out, it will try for the WITH call letters. The station's help-wanted ads have been replaced with a big band/nostalgia format with the exception of five hours of INFO-Talk on Saturday and Sunday mornings.

Baltimoreans will recognize many of the names working with Hodes. His two managing consultants are Tony Brandon, owner of 14 Western-based radio stations, and Harry Shriver, who was the president and general manager of WFBR-AM radio for 18 years. Jim Ward is the station's general manager and Paul Potter the operations manager. D.J.s include Ken Jackson, Wayne Gruen and Alan Field, who are playing records from their private collections.

Remember Joe Ehrmann, the former Colts star who left football many years ago to become the Reverend Ehrmann, founder of an inner city ministry named the Door?

This great big nice guy has invited lots of his old football buddies like Raymond Berry and John Unitas to join him at "Colts, Cattle & Charity." Dress is casual for the fund-raiser, which will be held at Timonium Fairgrounds from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. June 23.

Emceeing the festivities will be Jerry Sandusky, Channel 11's sports anchor. Tickets are $30 each and may be reserved by calling The Door, (410) 675-3288.

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