Thompson tells MPT breakfast of the battling O's

SYLVIA BADGER

June 11, 1993|By SYLVIA BADGER

One of Baltimore's most popular sportscasters, Chuck Thompson, was the guest speaker at the Maryland Public Television's All-Star Underwriter's Breakfast at the Camden Club this week. More than 100 people enjoyed listening to his stories and his opinion about the recent brawl at the stadium between Baltimore and Seattle players.

He suggested that three days' pay would be a fair fine for the players involved. After all, he went on to say, some of the players get about $6,000 each time at bat, so they would certainly feel the loss of three days' pay.

In August, Thompson, who has announced Baltimore sports for more than 40 years, will become the 16th baseball broadcaster to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.

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It was difficult not to miss the arrival of talk-show host Oprah Winfrey when she rolled up in front of the Polo Grill in the Doubletree Inn at the Colonnade in a stretch limo. Winfrey, who dined with two others on lobster tails and a $47 bottle of French wine, was in town to hype her book, "Oprah: An Autobiography," scheduled for release in September.

An interesting combination of Marylanders were guests of the Baltimore Jewish Council for a fantastic 10-day trip to Israel. The itinerary included eating at a kibbutz, swimming in the Dead Sea and visiting with Knesset members of the Labor and Likud parties.

Linda and Marcellus Alexander, he's general manager of WJZ-TV; Baltimore City Councilman Tony Ambridge; Baltimore County Councilman Dutch Ruppersberger and his wife, Kay; Rachel and Jan Houbolt, Greater Baltimore Committee; Roger Lyons, Urban League; Arthur C. Abramson, Baltimore Jewish Council; Shaila Aery, state secretary of higher education; Shelley and Dr. Dan Morhaim; Catherine Pugh, C. E. Pugh and Co.; Karen and Sanford Teplitzky, president of the Baltimore Jewish Council; Herbert Goldman, who chaired the trip; Del. Maggie McIntosh; Teddi and the Rev. Leland Mebust, returned with a better understanding of Israel.

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Buffalo wings, ribs, hard and soft crabs, and shrimp were a hit with Neil Diamond and guests at a private backstage party after Diamond's Baltimore Arena concert. The food was provided by Bill Bateman, owner of a Harford Road restaurant and express eateries in Parkville and Dundalk, all named for him. I hear Bob Goldstein, CEO of Maryland Sound, was one of the few local people at the party.

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It's almost time for the Maryland Historical Society's "Midsummer Night's Revelry." Togas, tuxedos or neo-classical costumes are acceptable modes of dress for next Friday evening's fun-raiser for the Classical Maryland exhibit.

Stiles Colwill, aided and abetted by some of Baltimore's best party people, is chairing the event, which features light dining and heavy dancing beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets, $50, may be reserved by calling the museum, (410) 685-3750.

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President Clinton has finally been able to keep a campaign promise, much to the delight of some of his Maryland classmates. He promised Georgetown University classmates, who worked on his campaign, that if he was elected they could have their 25th class reunion at the White House.

So last weekend, Dave Willemain, Mayor's Office, with his guest, Valerie Robbins, Johns Hopkins; Steve Sfekas, Weinberg & Green; author Tom Caplan; James Hardesty, Mercantile Bank; Mike Dillon and his wife, Ebbie, both of Hopkins; Hap MacDougall, Shapiro & Olander, and his wife, Carol Prichard, also a classmate; Steve Alpern, Columbia lawyer; Barry Polon, World's Finest Chocolate; and Chris Cable of Annapolis and her husband, Bill, gathered on the South Lawn of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue for one of the more festive Georgetown reunions.

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The 20th anniversary of the Peter Belfer Memorial Fund at Johns Hopkins Hospital was celebrated this week. Belfer, who died at the age of 25 from a congenital heart condition, was born a blue baby, named for the color babies turn due to poor circulation. This defect is no longer a serious problem, thanks to an operation pioneered at Hopkins by Dr. Alfred Blalock and Dr. Helen Taussig.

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