Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol...

VOTES IN CONGRESS

May 30, 1993

Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week:

Y: YES N: NO X: NOT VOTING

HOUSE: TROOPS IN SOMALIA

By a vote of 127 for and 299 against, the House rejected an amendment to bring U.S. forces home from Somalia by June 30. The House then passed a measure (SJ Res 45) authorizing American troops to remain in Somalia for at least another year under the War Powers Act. About 5,000 GIs remain there under United Nations command, down from a peak deployment of 25,000 in 1992.

A yes vote was to withdraw American troops from the U.N. force in Somalia by June 30.

Y N X Member

Y * * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Y * * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

* N * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

* N * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

* N * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

* N * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

* N * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: DEFENSE SPENDING

By a vote of 188 for and 244 against, the House rejected an amendment deleting $1.2 billion in deficit military spending from a $1.8 billion appropriations bill (HR 2118) for fiscal 1993. The amendment sought to force the Pentagon to get the money from other defense accounts instead of by borrowing. The funding consists mainly of $750 million for operations in Somalia, $295 million for civilian medical insurance claims and $100 million for Air Force patrols over southern Iraq. The House sent the bill to the Senate.

A yes vote was to require the disputed military spending to be put on a pay-as-you-go basis.

Y N X Member

* N * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

* N * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

* N * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

* N * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Y * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: JOBS BILL

The House passed, 287 for and 140 against, a bill to spend $920 million immediately on creating summer jobs for city youth, launching public works projects and hiring more police at the state and local level. The "son-of-stimulus" measure (HR 2244) was a reduced version of the $19 billion White House-sponsored jobs measure that filibustering Republicans recently killed in the Senate. This stimulus bill does not worsen the deficit because it is paid for by cuts elsewhere in the budget.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Y N X Member

Y * * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

* N * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Y * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: NEW PROGRAM

By a vote of 176 for and 251 against, the House refused to strip the jobs and infrastructure bill (above) of $80 million for a pilot program to qualify persons ages 17 to 30 for the job market. Participants would learn skills, receive classroom instruction and get a $100 weekly stipend for meals, transportation and personal needs.

A yes vote opposed the new program.

Y N X Member

Y * * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

Y * * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

* N * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

Y * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

* N * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

* N * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

* N * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

Y * * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: FISCAL MEDICINE

The House passed, 219 for and 213 against, a bill (HR 2264) that would enact President Clinton's plan to rehabilitate the U.S. economy with massive spending restraint, tax increases and entitlement curbs phased in over five years. The measure would slow national debt growth by $500 billion but still allow red ink to expand by 25 percent over today's level, to a projected $4 trillion-plus in fiscal 1998.

The bill's $250 billion in net tax increases would result mainly from raising rates on wealthy individuals ($115 billion), imposing a BTU tax on most residential and commercial energy consumption ($71.5 billion) and business tax increases including corporate rate increase ($36.6 billion).

On the spending side, the plan seeks an additional $250 billion ideficit reduction primarily by restraining defense and other discretionary outlays ($102 billion), curbing certain Medicare costs ($78.6 billion) and paying less in debt service as a result of the legislation ($50 billion).

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Y N X Member

* N * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

* N * Bartlett, Roscoe G., R-6th

Y * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rd

* N * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1st

Y * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5th

Y * * Wynn, Albert R., D-4th

Y * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7th

* N * Morella, Constance A., R-8th

HOUSE: GOP ALTERNATIVE

By a vote of 138 for and 295 against, the House rejected the Republican alternative to the Clinton fiscal plan (above). The GOP measure differed mainly by not raising taxes and achieving more than double the discretionary spending savings eyed by Democrats. The Republican plan sought to reduce deficit growth by about $400 billion over five years, 20 percent below the Democratic target.

A yes vote supported the GOP fiscal plan.

N X Member

* N * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2nd

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