Kelley hired by Howard Replaces Storch as soccer coach

May 27, 1993|By Rick Belz | Rick Belz,Staff Writer

Dave Kelley, a 36-year-old elementary school physical education teacher with a broad soccer coaching background, is the new boys varsity soccer coach at Howard High.

Kelley, who coaches the Columbia Crew, an under-19 boys club team that will play for the state cup championship the first weekend in June, replaces Rudy Storch, who resigned after last season.

Storch led Howard to a state championship in 1989 and was credited with building a strong program at Howard, which won more games during the combined 1989 and 1990 seasons than any other team in the state.

el,.3l "It will be hard following Rudy, but they have selected someone perfectly capable of carrying on what Rudy and Howard accomplished to this point," Centennial coach Bill Stara said.

Kelley, an Ellicott City resident who was a first-team All-Met striker at Largo High before playing at Frostburg State, has guided boys and girls high school varsity teams.

l He coached the varsity boys team for four years at Walter Johnson High, where two of his teams reached the regional playoffs. He also coached the girls varsity team at Richard Montgomery High.

Kelley started the women's soccer program at UMBC in 1988 but resigned after three seasons.

"Recruiting is the key to college coaching and I found that it was too time-consuming, so I started coaching a club team," Kelley said.

That team, the Columbia Crew, won a state cup in 1990 and made it to the finals last season.

He also coached in the girls Olympic Development Program from 1990 to 1992.

"I think high school is the most enjoyable level to coach because there is no recruiting so there's an even playing field," said Kelley, who holds a United States Soccer Federation A level license. "At Howard I think I'm getting into a good situation."

Kelley teaches at Cannon Road Elementary School in Montgomery County.

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