Hot and sweet: deep-fried jalapenos, lemon sponge pie and sugarless cookies

RECIPE FINDER

May 26, 1993|By Ellen Hawks | Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer

Something hot, something sweet or a sugarless treat.

New recipes can be fun to make, particularly if you have the choice of stuffed jalapeno peppers, an easy-to-make lemon sponge pie or sugarless cookies.

A. E. S. of Baltimore was anxious to find a recipe for a sugarless cake or cookie. A cookie was chosen for her, sent in by Betsy Hughes of Baltimore.

Hughes' sugarless cookie

Makes about 3 dozen

1 cup flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup soft butter or margarine

1 cup finely chopped walnuts or pecans

1 cup grated coconut

1/2 cup finely chopped dates

1/2 cup raisins

1 egg beaten

2 teaspoons vanilla

Combine flour, baking powder and salt in bowl. Cut in the butter until crumbly. Stir in remaining ingredients and chill for 1 hour. Shape into 1-inch balls then flatten them on a greased cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown.

*

Donna Scott and Cindy Goodman, no address, requested a recipe for jalapeno peppers stuffed with cheese,

breaded and deep-fried.

Debbie Temple of Street came up with a good choice which she notes was from the Houston Post about five years ago.

And here's a tip: You might want to wear rubber gloves when handling foods such as jalapenos. The fiery spice can sometimes be felt on the skin as well as the tongue.

Debbie's fried jalapenos

Makes 6 or more servings

2 jars whole jalapenos

2 cups grated sharp cheese

2 eggs

1/2 cup milk

flour to roll in

oil for deep-frying

Carefully remove seeds and membrane from the pepper without tearing them. With your little finger stuff each with as much grated cheese as you can press into it without tearing.

RF Mix eggs and milk. Roll a pepper in flour, then in egg mixture and

again in flour, being sure to pack the flour well over the opening at the top of the pepper. Then roll again in the egg mixture and in the flour, and, again, pack it well on top.

Set peppers aside and allow the coating to set while you heat oil to 350 degrees in deep pan on the stove. Use high heat. Deep-fry peppers until they are browned, no more than 1 minute.

Ms. Temple says the peppers freeze well before frying. Put them on cookie sheet in the freezer; then store them in freezer bags. When you want a few, take out and fry.

Because they're spice, she noted, "Don't serve these to cowards."

* Janine Venezia of Timonium wrote, "my grandmother used to make a wonderful lemon sponge pie and I have yet to find a good recipe for it."

Mrs. Byron Heimbach of Milton, Pa., may have answered her request with a pie that she said "was my mother's. Everyone always liked it so much. She made it for many occasions such as festivals and bake sales."

Heimbach's lemon sponge pie

1 cup sugar

1 walnut-sized piece of butter rubbed to a cream

2 rounded tablespoons flour

2 egg yolks and whites beaten separately

juice and grated rind of 1 lemon

1 cup milk

Mix all of the ingredients, adding the stiff egg whites last; pour into a 9-inch unbaked pastry shell. Bake at 400 degrees for about 15 minutes and then 350 degrees for about 35 minutes.

* Chef Syglowski, with the help of chefs and students at the Baltimore International Culinary College, selected and tested these recipes.

Recipe requests * Rita T. Werthamer of Baltimore is looking for an Italian dessert, light cake called tiramisu. She says she can't find it in any of her cookbooks.

* Caroline Chaney of Eldersburg is looking for a recipe similar to the squaw bread served at the Chart House. She also wants the recipe for a beef stroganoff that appeared on the back of the Mueller's egg noodle package.

* If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request for a long-gone recipe, maybe we can help. Write to Ellen Hawks, Recipe Finder, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278.

If you send in more than one recipe, put each on a separate sheet of paper with your name, address and phone number. Please print clearly. We will test the first 12 recipes sent to us.

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