Severna Park defeats N. County, 18-5 Girls lacrosse

May 22, 1993|By Katherine Dunn | Katherine Dunn,Staff Writer

Severna Park's girls lacrosse team might be feeling the pressure to continue its sweep of state Class 3A-4A titles, but the No. 3 Falcons don't play like it.

With an 18-5 victory over North County in yesterday's Class 3A-4A state semifinal, the Falcons (15-0) advance to Wednesday's final where they will try for their fourth title -- or their seventh, depending on how you look at it. Since the official state tournament began in 1990, the Falcons have swept the Class 3A-4A titles. Before that, they won three consecutive state/regional titles.

The Falcons will try to keep their title streak alive when they play thewinner of tomorrow's C. Milton Wright-South Carroll game Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Catonsville Community College.

"There is a lot of pressure to stay on top," said senior Lizzy Warfield. "Every year, people say, 'It's the same old thing -- here's Severna Park again.' But we have to work to stay on top. We don't just walk out and win the game."

Last night, the Falcons used aggressive defense and a phenomenal passing game to get past Anne Arundel County rival North County (8-7).

Colleen Gately scored the first Falcons' goal 52 seconds into thegame. North County, however, scored when Michelle Dillow connected with April Hall less than a minute later. But the Falcons came back with six straight goals to take a 7-1 lead with 10:01 left in the half.

The Knights pulled to five back twice -- on Karen Wick's goal and on Melanie McMullen's goal after Gately's second score. But the Falcons finished the half with two goals to take a 10-3 lead.

In the second half, the Falcons scored eight of the first nine goals. Ten players scored for the Falcons. Warfield and Wylde had three each. Gately, Liz Wilson, Tressa Campbell and Amy Carnaggio had two each. Stephanie Roberts, Kathy McCafferty, Kelly Clark and Shelley Seivert had one.

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