Penney eyes space at Hunt Valley MallThe old Macy's space...

CONSUMER MARKETPLACE

May 15, 1993|By MICHAEL DRESSER | MICHAEL DRESSER,STAFF WRITER

Penney eyes space at Hunt Valley Mall

The old Macy's space at Hunt Valley Mall is getting a sprucing-up -- apparently in anticipation of a visit by officials of J.C. Penney Co.

Gayle Barge, a spokeswoman for Penney, confirms that the Dallas-based retailer has been invited by the mall's developers to take a look at the property. But she says it's far too early for people to get their hopes up.

"We look at hundreds of projects each year," she said.

Penney has been at the top of the wish list for Hunt Valley tenants ever since Macy's closed last summer, leaving the mall with only Sears as an anchor. So far, hopes for an early replacement have been --ed, but the mall's management company, Kravco Co., is telling tenants to expect some news in June.

One sign of progress: Kravco and Equitable Real Estate Investment Management Inc., the development partners, have bought back the anchor shell from R.H. Macy & Co.

Michael Wingard, owner of Coffee, Tea & Thee, says the mood at the mall is improving with the weather. "I'm not so pessimistic."

Whether Penney would go into the mall is iffy. On one hand, it would fill a geographical gap between the chain's stores in White Marsh Mall and Security Square Mall without significantly cannibalizing either. On the other hand, Hunt Valley is a mall with nTC troubled history where a previous department store tenant bailed out. Only one thing is certain: If Penney does come in, it will be able to negotiate very generous terms.

Fair Lanes center to ban smoking

Hunt Valley-based Fair Lanes Inc. will clear the air at its Owings Mills bowling center June 1, when it introduces a no-smoking policy there.

Mac Clayton, Fair Lanes' chief executive, said the move is a response to customer demand for a smoke-free environment for family bowling. Nearby Fair Lanes bowling centers, including those in Pikesville and Kings Point, will continue to allow smoking.

To introduce the Owings Mills program, Fair Lanes will hold a carnival-like celebration called "Spare Your Family . . . Make a Strike Against Smoking" June 5 at the center, 10379 Reisterstown Road.

Through June, smokers who come to the Owings Mills center can check their cigarettes at the door and receive a voucher for a free snack item or soda. Patrons who throw out their cigarettes at the center will receive one free game.

Mall to collect boots for homeless

Towson Town Center would like to give homeless people the boot today.

No, the mall hasn't launched a campaign to hustle poor people out of the mall. Rather it and Project Hunger are holding a drive from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. to collect boots for area homeless shelters.

Steve Chaiken, co-founder of Project Hunger, says many homeless people could get jobs if they had proper boots. So his group and the mall are asking shoppers to bring used or unused boots of any size to the mall's Customer Service Center on Level 2.

The drive will also collect non-perishable foods.

Outlet center opens near Lancaster, Pa.

Baltimore-area outlet shoppers now have another destination where they can save their way into debt.

MillStream Factory Shops, an outlet center with more than 50 factory-direct and outlet stores, opened last month near Lancaster, Pa. Among the companies represented at the center are Donna Karan, Ann Taylor, Reebok, Oshkosh B'Gosh, London Fog and Brooks Brothers.

The center was developed by Enterprise Development Co. of Columbia, the company that James W. Rouse founded after leaving The Rouse Co.

Enterprise also owns a piece of the project, which is four miles east of Lancaster on U.S. 30.

Gray Kirk wins in Addy competition

Gray Kirk/VanSant, the Baltimore ad agency, racked up 10 honors in the District 2 Addy Competition, becoming the only firm outside New York to rank in the top five winners in the region, which stretches from New York to the District of Columbia.

The three Addy awards and seven citations qualify Gray Kirk to advance to the national Addy competition in June.

The agency's most honored work was its campaign for "The Fires of Kuwait," a movie shown at the Maryland Science Center. That campaign won two Addys. Other winning campaigns were for AAI Corp., Sallie Mae, Jiffy Lube Inc. and USF&G Corp.

Also claiming victory in the District 2 competition was Cornerstone, a Baltimore firm that captured two Addy awards, one for its work for the B&O Railroad Museum and the other for its own holiday card.

Needlepoint shop in Graul's building

Oops.

Contrary to a report in this space last week, Graul's Market is not all that shoppers will find on the first level of the Graul's building in Ruxton after renovations are completed this fall.

Graul's President Harold Graul says Bernice Janofsky Needlepoint, formerly located on the second level of the Bellona Avenue building, will also occupy a street-level space. The store is scheduled to reopen Aug. 1.

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