CENTRAL COUNTY--Arnold * Broadneck * Severna Park * Crownsville * Millersville

May 03, 1993

Zoning appeal hearing on bar signs is postponed for lack of stenographer

A zoning appeals hearing that would have determined whether an Arnold liquor store could keep its paper signs posted was postoned because the county stenographer never showed up.

Kim Lawson, the owner of Fishpaw's on Ritchie Highway, is appealing a county decision from July that she'd failed to prove that large paper signs, like those plastered on her store's exterior, were the store's method of advertising before a 1952 zoning law went into effect.

The county has said the signs went up after the law.

The Greater Severna Park Council has opposed the hand-lettered signs as unsightly.

A year and a half ago, the county informed Fishpaw's that the signs papering its white frame building weren't legal.

Ms. Lawson and her sister, Rachel Lawson, have stated that they have decided to appeal the decision by the county zoning office.

The hearing before the Board of Appeals is being rescheduled for July.

Victim of beating has plastic surgery

A man found inside a parked truck off Benfield Boulevard Thursday had been beaten so badly that he had to have immediate plastic surgery to repair his facial bones and nose.

County police found Timothy Charles Wyngmiller, of Churchton, sitting in the truck around 1 a.m., bleeding from his nose and face. Police reported that Mr. Wyngmiller smelled of alcohol.

Mr. Wyngmiller and two friends had been at Michael's Eighth Avenue in Glen Burnie earlier. When they left the club, police said, a Green Mustang followed them, and its occupants threw beer bottles. Mr. Wyngmiller's party was unable to lose the other vehicle and was forced to stop near Benfield Boulevard.

Three of five people from the Mustang beat Mr. Wyngmiller, police said. He was transported to North Arundel Hospital by ambulance, where he was admitted for plastic surgery.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.