In Defense Of Trooper VinsonI am a citizen of the Mount...

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

May 02, 1993

In Defense Of Trooper Vinson

I am a citizen of the Mount Airy area patrolled by Trooper Damon Vinson, of the State Police. I and many others have found him to be dedicated, friendly and fair. He is of excellent character and projects this to all people he comes in contact with.

Trooper Vinson conducts himself in a manner that does much to enhance the integrity of the State Police. Many of us have slept better knowing he is out there doing this very dangerous and difficult job.

After reading recent newspaper articles, I have found it disturbing that someone heard of an altercation in Mount Airy and felt the need to come onto the scene and make what was termed a citizen's arrest. The fact that policemen were already there doing their job seemed of no concern to this individual. The papers further stated, this man feared Trooper Vinson would not arrest a black person and therefore he felt the need to do so. This is absurd by any stretch of the imagination and says a lot for the mind set and character of the person making the assertion.

This letter is to thank Trooper Vinson for all he is doing on the behalf of all people. His presence in Mount Airy may well have defused a situation that could have become much more serious.

Midge Thomas

Mount Airy

Trash Collection

The editorial March 4 ("Time To Trash Haulers' Subsidy") states that the Solid Waste Collection Committee chose to ignore the finding that division of the county into sections and then having haulers bid on these routes would produce lower costs for county residents now using private haulers.

This is a misconception on the part of the writer. The committee voted five for and five opposed to sending a recommendation to the commissioners to further pursue a county-wide trash pickup system. Obviously, at least half of the committee was not comfortable with the figures presented or of the concept of the county being involved with the trash collection at all.

No mention was made of the concern that the dollar figures for the contracts that the six municipalities have cannot be representative of a figure for sectional bidding on a county-wide basis. The density of town pick-up is an obvious benefit in trash bids for towns. Does anyone believe that the meld of town and countryside would result in a bid that in any fashion would approximate the town figure?

The concern that at least half of the committee held was that government -- be it town, county or state -- has rarely demonstrated its ability to do most things as efficiently as private enterprise. In effect, "if it's not broke, don't fix it."

Of equal concern was the fact that a county-wide bidding process would effectively shut out the smaller private haulers. . . .

Another valid concern is the fact that county government will need to hire additional staff to administer the contract and enforce its provisions. Do we want more county government? . . .

I believe that the Carroll County commissioners are on the right track. . . .

Arthur H. Peck

Westminster

Aiding Russia

As Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin met at the Vancouver Summit, we started to reflect on our lives as students. . . . We

remembered our teachers telling us the importance of knowing our past. They emphasized how events have a tendency to repeat themselves and, as well-informed citizens, we need to be vigilant so that we do not make the same mistakes because we assume the situation is different. . . . There are those who will say the situation in Russia is different today than in the early 1920s. In our opinion, it is not.

Boris Yeltsin has supposedly freed Russia from the control of communism and is moving the country from a military-based economy to that of a free-market society. Based on past history, we believe Mr. Yeltsin's control is in constant threat from the communists and/or the military.

At this summit, our president gave Russia non-repayable grants, grain credits, technical assistance and most favored nation trading status. Why? Because the Cold War is over and Russia's economy is in shambles. Will the U.S. dollars bolster the ruble on the world market? We don't think it will, but the dollars will increase the power of those in control. The grain credits will fill the stomachs of the masses. The technical assistance is something the KGB worked long and hard to get and now we give it to them for free. Finally, trade enables the Russians to unload their inferior products on our markets cheaply. . . .

After World War I, Russia's economy was in chaos and Lenin's attempt at communism was failing and millions were starving. The U.S. sent food, medicine and other supplies and the people of Russia, with full stomachs, embraced Lenin. . . . After World War II and the Cold War, the U.S. and Soviet relations were not so cordial. President Clinton's lack of knowledge on foreign affairs and respect for the military has caused him to buy into the soft-on-communism philosophy of former President Carter's advisers, who he has in his inner circle.

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