Maryland Stage Company's 'Lear' will feature original...

THIS WEEK

May 02, 1993|By J. Wynn Rousuck

Maryland Stage Company's 'Lear' will feature original music

The Maryland Stage Company, the theater company in residence at the University of Maryland Baltimore County, tackles one of its most awesome challenges when Shakespeare's "King Lear" opens Thursday at the UMBC

Theatre.

Directed by Xerxes Mehta and starring Sam McCready, the production also features Wendy Salkind as Lear's daughter Goneril and James Brown-Orleans as the Fool. Original music has been composed by Forrest Tobey. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays through May 22. Tickets are $8. (Tickets to preview performances Tuesday and Wednesday are $5.) For more information, call (410) 455-2476.

@ Howard Korder's "Search and Destroy," a morality tale for the 1990s, will have its Baltimore premiere at Fells Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St., beginning Friday.

Directed by John Blair, this dark comedy about modern American life is set against a panorama of drugs, fast cash and violence. Show times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. through June 13. Tickets are $9. The theater cautions that "Search and Destiny" is for mature audiences only. For further information, call (410) 276-7837.

@

J. Wynn Rousuck Aleck Karis is one of America's best young pianists, as highly rated for his performances of thorny contemporary pieces by Milton Babbitt or Eliott Carter as he is for the masterpieces of Chopin or Schumann. Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the fine arts recital hall of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Karis will conclude UMBC's springtime festival of contemporary art with a free piano recital. His program will feature "Sonatas and Interludes" by John Cage and "Toward the Midnight Sun" by Joji Yuasa, which was written for quadraphonic computer-generated tape and piano. For further information, call (410) 455-2942.

Stephen Wigler

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