Age can decide how much to invest PERSONAL FINANCE

May 02, 1993|By Knight-Ridder News Service

How much of your money should be invested in stocks? A rule of thumb is to subtract your age from 100. The number you get is the percentage of your assets that should be in equities. Using that rule, someone age 65 might have 35 percent of his assets invested in stock.

Remember, however, that no rule of thumb is perfect. People investing in stocks also must consider their ability to stomach stock-market swings, among other things.

The news recently has not been good for people who like U.S. savings bonds.

Sales plunged in March after the government slashed the guaranteed minimum rate it pays on those securities.

March sales totaled only $1.41 billion, the lowest level in eight months. That was down from $2.03 billion in February and $2.55 billion in January.

The interest rate paid on savings bonds will fluctuate as overall interest rates change. But bonds held five years or longer are guaranteed to earn a certain minimum. Effective March 1, that guaranteed minimum was reduced to 4 percent from 6 percent.

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