Taneytown * Union Bridge * New Windsor

TANEYTOWN SEARCHES FOR A MASCOT NORTHWEST --

April 20, 1993|By Traci A. Johnson | Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer

You can recognize a Baltimore Orioles fan by the orange-and-black bird emblazoned on everything they have, from bumper stickers to beach towels.

But how can you tell if someone loves the city of Taneytown?

Enter Tuscurora Taney the Otter.

"I think it would kind of give the city a little pizazz," said City Manager Joseph A. Mangini Jr. of the city mascot he's proposed. "I'm looking into public relations, getting more people interested in the city of Taneytown."

Mr. Mangini recommended to the City Council that Taneytown should adopt a flag and a mascot to promote the city.

The flag idea has been generally accepted by the council, Mr. Mangini said. The proposal is for a navy-blue version of the city's seal on a white background with a blue border.

But Tuscurora Taney is still being considered.

"I think there are mixed opinions about it on the council," Mr. Mangini said. "I submitted a proposal and they are considering it."

Although Mr. Mangini said the otter was only a suggestion, it appears to be an appropriate symbol for the city.

The Tuscarora Indians inhabited the Taneytown area before the city's founding in 1754. The tribe hunted many of the woodland creatures, including, otters, wildcats, deer and wolves that populated the area.

"It's all about recognition for the city," said Mr. Mangini. "I want it to be a city mascot."

Mr. Mangini said he believes a mascot, like the Orioles' bird for Baltimore, would become a familiar symbol for Taneytown and give the city a sense of identity.

"I told the the council that the mascot could be present when new businesses open, with the mayor and the mascot cutting the ribbon," he said. "I have already talked to the police about the possibility that the mascot could be used in schools to talk about drugs in the drug-prevention program."

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