North Laurel/savage

March 18, 1993

Savage Mill exhibit features 8 black artists

An exhibition titled "Shades/Hues: Variations in Black" will feature the works of eight black artists through April 30 at the Ruby Blakeney Gallery at Historic Savage Mill.

Artists represented in the show are Sam Gilliam, Joyce Scott, Oletha DeVane, Kimberly Camp, Lillian Burwell, Ulysses Marshall, Joyce Wellman and Lawrence Hurst.

Known for his improvisational, draped canvasses, Mr. Gilliam has exhibited nationally and internationally. His most recent show was at Drysdale Gallery in Washington.

The handmade paper pieces of Ms. Scott will be making their debut in Howard County. Last year her work was featured in a solo show at the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

Ms. Wellman brings unstretched canvases and drawing to Savage after participating in shows at the Anacostia Museum in Washington and the Arlington Art Center in Virginia.

Director of the Experimental Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, Ms. Camp returns to the Blakeney Gallery, where her paintings and soft sculpture were displayed last fall.

Featured in numerous solo shows and exhibitions of works by black artists, Mr. Marshall is represented by works with "a narrative or storytelling quality."

Ms. Burwell, a Washington resident, brings her painted constructed forms to the Blakeney following an exhibit at National Capital Park Services Headquarters in celebration of National Women's History Month.

Ms. DeVane is former director of visual arts of the Maryland State Arts Council. Some of her most recent works are included in a traveling exhibition developed by the Eubie Blake National Museum in Baltimore.

Mr. Hurst's paintings blend pastels, gouache and watercolors. His most recent show was at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.

Information: 880-4935 or (301) 317-4028.

POLICE LOG

*Jessup: 7800 block of Pocomoke Drive: Someone stole a Maryland license tag (1A50790) from a vehicle about 3:30 p.m. Friday.

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