Altman jury selection beginsJury selection began in the...

BUSINESS DIGEST

March 16, 1993

Altman jury selection begins

Jury selection began in the trial of Robert Altman, a key figure in the BCCI scandal, but a judge indicated he would agree to a delay in opening arguments to allow the defense more time to prepare. Mr. Altman's attorney complained yesterday in New York state Supreme Court that the defense needed time to review documents. He also charged that prosecutors didn't provide sufficient access to key papers that could exonerate Mr. Altman.

Sales of U.S.-built vehicles rise

Sales of domestically built cars and trucks rose 7.8 percent in early March, allaying fears that a drop-off in sales at the end of February signaled renewed weakness in the market.

NuTek offers Macintosh clone

After virtual monopoly, a small computer maker is offering a clone of Apple Computer Inc.'s famous Macintosh. NuTek USA Corp., headquartered in Apple's hometown of Cupertino, Calif., said it has developed a computer "motherboard" that will run most Macintosh applications. NuTek plans to license the technology to independent computer makers at a price of $899 each.

Clinton names RTC chief

President Clinton yesterday named Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman the interim chief executive of the Resolution Trust Corp. Mr. Altman will replace Albert Casey, a Bush appointee who announced his resignation last week. Mr. Altman will also keep his job at the Treasury.

S&P lowers Sears debt rating

Standard & Poor's Corp. lowered ratings on about $17 billion of Sears, Roebuck and Co. debt amid concern that the company will have difficulty in reviving its retail operations.

Hearst forming new media group

The Hearst Corp. said yesterday that it will form a new operating group responsible for creating, guiding and managing its interests in new media and the technologies that generate them.

Trade talks resume tomorrow

U.S., Mexican and Canadian officials resume talks tomorrow on the North American Free Trade Agreement to negotiate side deals on jobs and the environment, which President Clinton says are essential to the accord.

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