Dining for soup kitchen

SYLVIA BADGER

March 14, 1993|By SYLVIA BADGER

Baby lamb chops, smoked salmon, chilled asparagus, pan-fried lobster and corn cake, washed down with Piper Heidsieck or Laboure Roi Pommard, hardly sounds like food served at a soup kitchen.

But Saturday night was the exception, as more than 140 guests paid $150 each for a dinner prepared by Milton Inn chef Mark Henry at Our Daily Bread for its first dinner benefit.

Guests enjoyed an evening of hors d'oeuvres, a six-course meal, wines, auctions and a photo essay by Loyola College students, "A Day in the Life of Our Daily Bread," which will continue to hang on the walls of the soup kitchen.

Others who helped Henry with this successful evening were 15 volunteer waiters from area restaurants and a dinner committee made up of Sandi Dolan, Barbara Brandjes, Betsy Callanan, Nikki Cole, Margaret Counselman, Anne Fishman, Susan Johnson, and Cynthia McIntyre.

According to soup kitchen director Steve Tuttle, the dinner raised enough money to feed 15,000 people.

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William Obrigkeit, assistant branch manager of Maryland National Bank's 10 Light St. branch, and F. Wilson Downey, vault attendant, had a surprise customer who wanted to take a look at his vault last week.

The visitor was a location scout with Hollywood's Warner Brothers Studio, which is searching for the perfect bank for a scene in "Pelican Brief," scheduled to begin filming this summer in Washington and New Orleans, with perhaps a few shots in our area.

Thus far, Alan Pakula is the director, and Julia "Pretty Woman" Roberts and Denzel "Malcolm X" Washington will co-star.

The film, based on that exciting John Grisham novel by the same name, is a Supreme Court Justice whodunit.

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In September 1991, Mary and Bill Pielert's 15 year-old-son, Chris Brehm, lost a three-month battle for his life at the Baltimore Regional Burn Center.

In 1992, the Pielerts founded the Christopher T. Brehm Memorial Fund and raised $9,000 from a softball tournament and a golf tournament. The money was earmarked for the Burn Center Foundation, which is using the funds to buy equipment and provide services for burn survivors.

This year's two-day softball tournament is scheduled for Saturday and next Sunday at Perry Hall elementary and middle schools, Joppa Road near Belair Road. Call Nadine Weinstein at the Burn Center Foundation, (410) 550-0895, if you'd like to participate or contribute to this effort.

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Since Willard Scott moved into the area, he has popped in for a bite to eat at the Suburban House in Pikesville. I'm told that owners Mark Horwitz and Joe Stowe dish up old-fashioned food at old-fashioned prices. You may not bump into Scott, but you're sure to see regulars Lt. Gov. Mickey Steinberg, Annabelle and Richard Sher, Ron Matz, Al Baitch, Dick Rudolph and John Dietrich.

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The Maryland Institute College of Art is fortunate to have landed David Carson (design director of Surfer Magazine and art director of the critically acclaimed music magazine Ray Gun) as its spring 1993 Art Litho Designer-in-Residence.

Carson's work has won more than 160 awards, including best overall design and magazine cover of the year and graphic designer of the year.

He will speak at 8 p.m. tomorrow night at the Institute's Mount Royal Station auditorium. The lecture is free and open to the public. His topic will be: "You Cannot Not Communicate."

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Remember former Miss Maryland Katrina Owens, who used to announce the lottery numbers on WJZ-TV? She's now living in St. Petersburg, Fla., where she's a hostess on the Home Shopping Club.

It turns out to be a great location for her while the Orioles are in spring training, because she gets a chance to see her fiance, O's catcher Chris Hoiles, play. No wedding date has been set, but she says they'll probably get married sometime next year.

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