Loyola zeroes in on search for coach

March 08, 1993|By Pete Dougherty | Pete Dougherty,Contributing Writer

ALBANY, N.Y. -- Joe Boylan spent the last two months surveying the situation. Now, as Loyola's basketball athletic director, he sets out to find his college a new basketball coach.

Boylan's tenure as Greyhounds interim coach ended latSaturday night -- actually 13 minutes into yesterday -- with a 57-37 loss to Manhattan. Loyola's fourth straight opening-round loss in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference tournament ended the worst season in school history at 2-25, 1-15 under Boylan.

He'll officially begin the search today for a successor to ToSchneider, who resigned Jan. 15, in hopes of having a coach in place before the Final Four in early April.

Boylan's hands-on study makes him aware of the state of this basketball program, 19-56 in four years as a MAAC member.

"It's been fun," Boylan said. "It has been a great experience fome, and I've been lucky to work with some good kids. They're not the most talented, but they're great kids."

Just how under-talented Loyola is was evident in the Manhattagame, which began an hour and 20 minutes late because of two earlier overtime games.

The Greyhounds shot 19 percent in the first half, in which thescored 12 points. Manhattan (21-6), the regular-season conference champion, played down to Loyola's level, committing turnovers overall and leading by 10 at the half.

"I would have been more comfortable if it was 42-32 at the halinstead of 22-12," Manhattan coach Fran Fraschilla said.

Fortunately for Manhattan, the Greyhounds have just one playewho likely would start on any other MAAC team. B. J. Pendleton finished with 16 points, but when he fouled out with 2:36 remaining, Loyola's other players had combined for just 17 points.

The new coach will have Pendleton for two more years and mosof the other Greyhounds, too. The only seniors who saw significant playing time were center George Sereikas, whose career ended three weeks ago with an anterior cruciate ligament tear in his right knee, and point guard Mike Malone, who had no points and no assists in his collegiate finale.

"It's very unusual for a team with this many losses not to steback and quit," Boylan said. "They never have. That's what it's all about."

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