Gleneagles clothing plant booming HARFORD BUSINESS

March 07, 1993|By Frank Lynch | Frank Lynch,Staff Writer

Business is booming at Gleneagles Bel Air clothing manufacturing plant, its owner says, and the company is considering adding up to 25 workers to meet demand.

"We can't predict how many jobs we will eventually furnish because so much depends on product demand," said Russell McKay, a vice president for J. Schoeneman Inc., owner of Gleneagles.

When Schoeneman bought the Williams Street plant in November for an undisclosed amount, James J. Stankovic, its president and chief executive officer, said he expected that as many as 75 former Gleneagles workers would be back to work by Christmas.

The plant, which also manufactures Christian Dior rainwear and some other outerwear products, employs 76 people on its production line. All production workers are members of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers of America.

"We were extremely happy with the response the Gleneagles rainwear label received at a recent national [Men's Retail Association] trade show in Chicago," said Mr. McKay.

Mr. McKay would not disclose the number of orders taken at the show, but he said it was sufficient "for us to feel the Gleneagles line will easily reach its goal in sales for the year."

If that goal is met more workers will be hired, most likely in midsummer.

When Gleneagles closed June 1, the plant employed 200 workers and another 80 people at its cutting and distribution facility in Towson.

Schoeneman's purchase of the Gleneagles plant was helped by a two-year low-interest loan package created by the state and local governments. The Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development (DEED) contributed $135,000 from its Industrial and Commercial Redevelopment Fund while Harford County and the Town of Bel Air each contributed $7,500.

DEED also provided a $40,000 training grant for upgrading workers' skills and for equipment.

Schoeneman, which manufactures men's clothing with labels such as Dior, Burberry and Halston, was founded in Baltimore 103 years ago.

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