25 Years Ago* One of the most modern schools in Carroll...

FLASHBACKS

March 07, 1993|By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County.

25 Years Ago

* One of the most modern schools in Carroll County, "The South Carroll," will be open to the public and a special dedication

program will be presented at 2 p.m. on Sunday, March 3. Mr. Chester Elder is the principal of this school, located in the Winfield area. The dedication program will be as follows: Prelude, "Star Spangled Banner," South Carroll High Band under the direction of Mr. Glenn Patterson; invocation by the Rev. Thomas Llewelyn, president of Carroll County Ministerial Association; musical selections, by The Troubadours, singers of madrigals, with Mrs. Florence Keppel, as director; presentation of the building, Mr. Edmund G. Good and Partners, architect; acceptance of the building by the president of the Board of Education, Mr. Thomas A. Raver. -- Democratic Advocate, Feb. 29, 1968.

50 Years Ago

* Harry M. Emigh Jr., East Main Street, a freshman at Gettysburg College and a member of the Enlisted Reserves at the college, will leave on Saturday from Gettysburg College with a class of 80 who will be inducted into the Army of the United States and will report at Fort George G. Meade. -- Democratic Advocate, Feb. 26, 1943.

75 Years Ago

* It appears that the ordinance relating to the shooting of firearms within the corporation limits is ignored to a great extent, particularly by those who have cat rifles. A number of these are in the hands of boys. A rigid application of the provisions of this ordinance may have the effect of minimizing this practice. -- Union Bridge Pilot, March 21, 1918.

100 Years Ago

* The Valentine Tea and Supper held by the King's Daughters in the I.O.O.F. Hall, on Saturday evening last, was a decided success throughout. Although the crowd was not as large as festivals have attracted, they served more than 100 suppers and did a thriving business with their fruits and confectionery, the latter of which was home-made and compared well with that of regular manufacture. A guess doll excited the conjecture bump of many persons and was quite a source of revenue from the guessers, none of whom registered the name. -- American Sentinel, Feb. 28, 1893.

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