Canseco makes appearance, but carefully weighs his stay

February 25, 1993|By Jim Henneman | Jim Henneman,Staff Writer

PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. -- An hour before the first full-squad workout for the Texas Rangers yesterday, every player scheduled had been accounted for except one.

It wasn't Nolan Ryan. The Hall of Fame-bound right-hander isn't expected until Monday, continuing his 20-year tradition of reporting on March 1.

The fashionably late player was Jose Canseco, who didn't roll into the parking lot until almost noon. His arrival caused a flurry among the media and spectators, but most of his teammates weren't aware of Canseco's arrival until they returned to the locker room.

Although the Rangers had expected Canseco to participate in yesterday's workout, he said he had planned all along to be in uniform for the first time today. He restricted his activity yesterday to the weight room.

"I got in late last [Tuesday] night to get myself settled and planned to work out tomorrow [today]," said Canseco. He appeared to be in excellent shape and said he was eager to put last year behind him.

"Last year, I could never take the time to rest my body," he said. "People don't understand how hard it is to do things when you're not healthy," said Canseco, who hit 26 home runs and drove in 87 runs in an off-year last season.

"I had some psychological problems that I had to deal with [last year], but I've been able to put them behind me. I want to show people what I can do. The key is for me to stay healthy."

The problems Canseco referred to were his estrangement from his wife, Esther, and the Aug. 31 trade that sent him from Oakland to Texas. "It seems like I had two divorces -- first from my wife, then from the Oakland A's."

His civil divorce is only now in the final stages, but Canseco agreed this spring training is a new beginning for him.

"That's an understatement," he said. "It's a new beginning for my career -- and my life."

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