Delegation proposes prisoner home detentionThe Carroll...

LEGISLATIVE BRIEFS

February 18, 1993

Delegation proposes prisoner home detention

The Carroll delegation plans to introduce a measure that would allow the county sheriff to establish and run a home-detention program for prisoners under certain conditions.

Modeled after a similar program in Frederick County, the measure would allow judges to sentence certain prisoners to home detention rather than time in the county's crowded jail.

Individuals would be eligible for the program if they had no other charges pending and had the recommendation of the sentencing judge. Prisoners would be ineligible if they are serving a sentence for "a crime of violence" or had been found guilty of such crimes as child abuse or escape from prison.

"I certainly support these efforts," said Commissioner Donald I. Dell after the delegation briefed him on the proposed legislation yesterday.

Sen. Larry E. Haines, R-Carroll and Baltimore, said he would check with Frederick officials to see how their program has fared since it began about a year ago.

School officials back drug-pricing bill

Carroll school officials were among the few who supported a measure by Del. Donald B. Elliott, R-Carroll and Howard, to eliminate discriminatory pricing for prescription drugs.

"The Board of Education of Carroll County has an intense interest in controlling the spiraling cost of health insurance," said William H. Hyde, assistant superintendent of administration, who supports the measure.

Mr. Hyde said prescription drugs represent $339,992 -- 50 percent of spending in major categories of health care -- up from $227,998 or 25 percent of the costs in 1989.

In introducing the bill, Mr. Elliott said hospitals get better prices than local pharmacies and that prices are not based on quantity.

Several pharmaceutical companies testified against the bill in a hearing before the Economic Matters Committee.

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