Loyola's half-game not enough Fairfield gets hot, scores 60-48 win

January 29, 1993|By Bill Tanton | Bill Tanton,Staff Writer

Fairfield University got hot in the second half and beat Loyola, 60-48, in a Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference game before 1,475 last night at Reitz Arena.

Loyola (2-13, 1-5) was tied 26-26 at halftime, but the Greyhoundlacked the scoring punch to keep up.

Fairfield (8-7, 2-2) was led by the strong showing from 6-foot-senior Drew Henderson, who had 13 rebounds and 15 points.

"That was a monster game for Drew," said his coach, PauCormier, who formerly coached at Dartmouth.

"We told our big men going in that Loyola's strength is its sizinside. We won't play a bigger team all year."

Henderson set an all-time scoring record for Fairfield, running hicareer total to 987. Within another week, he is expected to become the school's first 1,000-point, 1,000-rebound player.

Loyola power forward B. J. Pendleton, who has scored in doublfigures in 13 of the Greyhounds' 14 games, was high scorer for the losers with 11.

This was Loyola's third game under the head coaching oathletic director Joe Boylan, who took over when Tom Schneider resigned two weeks ago, and its first at home with its new coach. Boylan is 1-3.

"Fairfield is a better team than the St. Peter's team we beaMonday," said Boylan. "We're better now defensively than we were a couple weeks ago, but offensively we need improvement.

"We stayed with them for a half, but we lost our composure for couple minutes and fell behind. We're just not a great offensive team, but our drop-back zone forced Fairfield to make 12 turnovers in the first half."

Fairfield is making steady improvement under Cormier, last nighequaling its win total for all of last season, when it was 8-20.

"I hope Loyola hangs with it," said Cormier. "They're going tbeat some teams. They've done a nice job in a short time getting an identity. That zone of theirs was tough for us to crack."

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