Upshaw: Eagles' White wants to play for Gibbs, Redskins

January 29, 1993|By Vito Stellino | Vito Stellino,Staff Writer

LOS ANGELES -- Philadelphia Eagles defensive lineman Reggie White wants to play for the Washington Redskins next year, Gene Upshaw, the executive director of the NFL Players Association, said yesterday.

Upshaw made the comment while briefing the media on the new legal settlement that will pave the way for legal peace in the NFL.

As one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuits, White can't be restricted by the Eagles, but he can't be signed by one of the top four teams unless they lose a free agent for a comparable salary.

"That's why he was rooting for San Francisco to beat the Redskins because he wants to play for the Redskins," Upshaw said.

As one of the second four teams, the Redskins are allowed to sign one player for more than $1.5 million a year. They can sign more for under $1 million.

The remaining 20 teams can sign as many free agents as they want.

When Upshaw was questioned after the news conference, he said White may still remain with Philadelphia, but likes to have the option of leaving.

"I know he looks at the Redskins as an opportunity to join a good team. He knows [coach] Joe Gibbs and the type of religious guy he is. That's one of the things he'll weigh. Now he has options," Upshaw said.

White will be free on March 1 to start negotiating with other teams.

Upshaw also said he hopes the settlement will lead to a collective bargaining agreement and progress toward expansion in the future.

He also said that the expansion fees will not be included in the designated gross revenue that must be counted once a salary cap is triggered at 67 percent.

That's an incentive for the owners to expand because they get to keep all of the expansion fees instead of sharing two-thirds of them with the players. That will be offset by the fact the owners will have to divide the TV revenue 30 ways instead of 28 ways once the league expands.

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