Glen Burnie residents, there's glamour and glitz in your midst GLEN BURNIE

NEIGHBORS

January 27, 1993|By BONITA FORMWALT

Beware, gentlemen. Something is happening to the women in this town. From a distance you may not even notice, but examine that little photo dangling from her key chain and you may discover that someone you love has been . . . glamorized!

For the uninitiated, an entire industry has been built to enable women to find that fantasy vixen lurking beneath the Glen Burnie Gopher sweat shirt.

It's now possible to find a whole new you, and it only takes several pounds of cosmetics, some fabulous feather accessories and a friend to help pry apart your mascara-coated eyelashes each time you blink.

Then someone snaps your picture.

There are pros and cons to this excursion into the world of glitz and sparkle. For example:

* Pro -- If you have a make-over done just before you get your picture taken for your driver's license, you will never again be too embarrassed to show your ID when writing a check.

* Con -- After comparing the driver's license with the actual you, the cashier at Value City may become suspicious and have you arrested for check fraud.

* Pro -- Finally, you will have big hair just like Jaclyn Smith and Christie Brinkley.

* Con -- Your hair may accidentally knock out the right side-view mirror when you try to enter your car.

* Pro -- Your mate will be so happy with the picture of the new you that he displays it prominently on his desk.

* Con -- Your mate will be so happy with the picture of the new you that he takes it to dinner and a movie.

Smile and say "cheese," Glen Burnie.

*

The role of Catholic schools in the education of America's young people will be celebrated at Arthur Slade Regional Catholic School next week.

"Choose Catholic Schools: The Good News In Education" is the theme and will be reflected in the activities and decorations at the school.

An open house and pancake breakfast starts off the week on Sunday.

Breakfast will be served from 9 a.m. to noon, while the open house will run from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.

Each day, a special group will be singled out for appreciation: Monday, teachers; Tuesday, staff; Wednesday, parents; Thursday, students; and Friday, the school itself.

Scheduled activities include trivia quizzes, academic bees, a paper airplane contest and a sock hop.

Students also will participate in a school-wide service project to benefit Chara House, a residential facility in Baltimore for HIV positive and at-risk children from birth to age 3. Families are invited to donate infant formula, disposable diapers, clothing, etc., which will be delivered by the Slade students.

For additional information, call the school office, 766-8614.

*

Glen Burnie's new congressman, Wayne Gilchrest, has scheduled a series of town meetings to get acquainted with his constituents on this side of the bay. Glen Burnie High is the location of his first local meeting, 7 p.m., Monday.

Congressman Gilchrest also has opened a local office in Suite 509 of the Arundel Center North building at Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard and Crain Highway.

The office will be staffed from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., weekdays.

For additional information, call 766-3372.

*

The crack of a wooden bat has been replaced by the thonnnggg of aluminum, and the faithful brown leather glove has been replaced with one that's day-glo orange.

But it's still baseball.

The Harundale Youth Sports League is preparing for its Opening Day on April 17.

Players ages 5 to 16 are invited to register and must provide copies of their birth certificate.

Registration for both baseball and softball are being accepted at Harundale Mall on Fridays, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and Saturdays, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., through Feb. 27.

Fees are $30 for one player and $50 for two or more.

Home fields for the league are located behind Corkran Middle School at Quarterfield Road and Thelma Avenue.

For registration information, call John Cody, 761-7486.

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