Tourney-tough Westminster awaits North Carroll Wrestling notebook

January 25, 1993|By Lem Satterfield | Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer

Westminster High wrestling coach Solomon Carr got nearly everything he wanted out of his Owls at Saturday's Friends Tournament -- except first place in the team standings.

Fifth-ranked Neil Brennan swept through the 145-pound division to improve to 21-2. Teammate Matt Warner won at 103, and Brad Shisler (135, 16-6) got a title by default over Loyola's two-time Maryland Scholastic Association champion, Tim Spielman.

After suffering an ankle injury on Wrestling notebook

Shisler's takedown attempt early in the bout, Spielman couldn't continue.

Westminster also got a third-place finish from Ray Green (103) and fourth-place showings from Ben Earhart (125) and Dennis Jennings (152).

Overall, however, the Owls were second in the 18-team field to Loyola, a team Westminster defeated in an earlier dual meet, 33-30.

"I'm pleased with the effort," said Carr, whose Owls are 4-5. "I would have liked to come in first place, but it didn't go that way."

Next up for Westminster: A visit from third-ranked county rival North Carroll tomorrow night.

The Panthers (8-0) are coming off another impressive outing, a 46-15 victory over South Hagerstown last week.

Although Westminster is struggling in dual meets, North Carroll coach Dick Bauerlein said the Owls won't be taken lightly by his Panthers, who built a 46-3 lead over South Hagerstown before the last two North Carroll wrestlers were pinned.

"We normally wrestle Westminster well and our kids should be up for them," said Bauerlein. "I expected them [the Owls] to have Shisler at 135, Brennan at 145 and Jennings at 152. They should be tough in a few matches."

Against South Hagerstown, Doug Dell (103, 12-0), Jeremy Myers (112, 14-0), Shawn Utz (160) and Chris Boog (171, 14-0) all recorded pins for North Carroll. Dell was done in 48 seconds and Myers in 33 seconds.

Freshman Tom Kiler (125, 14-0) had the toughest bout of the evening, edging Phil Walters, 3-2. Kiler's older brother, Andy (130, 14-0), downed Doug Michaels, 11-3.

In 1987, DeMatha coach Dick Messier coached the Stags to an upset of Aberdeen, ending a three-year dual-meet winning streak.

This past Friday night in Millersville, the Columbia resident watched his Stags, ranked 10th by the Maryland State Wrestling Association, fall short of upsetting four-time state champion Old Mill, ranked No. 2 in The Baltimore Sun poll and No. 6 by the Maryland State Wrestling Association.

Messier's squad led, 26-12, with four bouts left, but the Patriots (6-0) scored three pins and a major decision to increase their dual meet winning streak to 27 with a 34-26 decision.

Messier's Stags (6-2) were without starting heavyweight wrestler, Decun Jamgochian, a promising football player who was taking a college visit.

"With him it might have been a different story," said Messier, whose Stags are seven-time Metro Conference champions. "But I think that all of our kids wrestled well and I'm glad Old Mill gave us the opportunity."

Sweet revenge

Howard County residents Danny DeVivo and Kevin Neville, top-ranked at 160 and 152 pounds, respectively, by the MSWA, scored three victories each to help lift top-ranked Mount St. Joseph (7-0) to a quad-meet sweep at Montgomery County's Bullis Saturday.

The Gaels' biggest win came by 42-21 over Riverdale Baptist of Prince George's County, the MSWA's top-ranked team in front of No. 2 Mount St. Joseph. The Gaels also downed Bullis, 48-21, and Altoona (Pa.), 36-24.

Mount St. Joseph had finished second to Riverdale in the Archbishop Curley and Annapolis tournaments.

Neville bumped up two weight classes, where he notched a 6-4 overtime victory over Riverdale Baptist's second-ranked Greg David (25-3).

DeVivo took just 54 seconds to finish the Crusaders' Jake Barry, once ranked sixth by the MSWA.

Columbia resident Russell Fecteau nearly upset Bullisfourth-ranked John Tam but lost, 15-14.

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