THEATER"A Moon for the Misbegotten," at Center Stage, 700...

WEEKEND PICKS

January 16, 1993|By J. WYNN ROUSUCK MOVIES

THEATER

"A Moon for the Misbegotten," at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St., ranges stylistically from abstract to naturalistic, and the result is as unconventional as it is pure Eugene O'Neill. The play continues the story of James Tyrone Jr., the character modeled after the playwright's alcoholic, womanizing older brother in "Long Day's Journey into Night." Stephen Markle plays Tyrone; Cherry Jones is the earthy farmer's daughter who redeems him. The boldly inventive direction is by Lisa Peterson. Show times are 8 tonight and 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. tomorrow. Tickets are $22 to $27. (410) 332-0033.

@ "Alive" is the movie that nobody would want to see -- people eating other people -- but many should. It follows the world-famous ordeal of a rugby team whose Uruguayan airliner went down in the Andes in 1972. Survivors had to eat the flesh of the dead to survive. Frank Marshall, the director, tells the story very matter-of-factly and may even underplay the triumph of survival at the end. But the story is shocking and a little awe-inspiring nevertheless. Ethan Hawke is memorable as the eventual leader. "Alive" features an intense plane crash, so be warned. R. ***.

STEPHEN HUNTER From a 1-inch-by- 3/4 -inch book with a cover of gold, enamel and rubies to a morocco binding made in the workshop of the French royal binder, there are many treats in the exhibit of book bindings at the Walters Art Gallery. This is one of the best of the gallery's continuing series of manuscript shows. Its scope is manageable, the material is well organized and labeled, and the variety and richness of the examples on view will surprise many. The bindings are what you don't see in most manuscript shows, when the books are open. The display continues at the Walters Art Gallery, 600 N. Charles St., through April 11. Call (410) 547-9000.

JOHN DORSEY

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