Johnetta ColeRe Carl Rowan's column, "The Character...

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

January 03, 1993

Johnetta Cole

Re Carl Rowan's column, "The Character Assassination Squad," Dec. 16: Amen, amen and amen.

I was aghast to hear of the attempt to slander Johnetta Cole, the highly esteemed, beloved, effective president of Spelman College, who currently is the education coordinator for President-elect Clinton's transition team.

Having known Dr. Cole since our college days at Oberlin, I could only wonder what on earth people who call themselves patriots of this country could be thinking of.

Coming from a venerable family of impeccable values, ethics, dignity and dedication to human service, Dr. Cole always has been one of those rare human beings who makes it her business to "put her money where her mouth is" in making a contribution to society.

As long as I have known her, even in the most trying personal and professional situations, she has been idealistic yet pragmatic, no-nonsense and soundly courageous in searching for ways in which to learn more deeply and to help better the human condition.

While far from rash, she never was one to sit on her hands for fear that she might be thought "wrong."

A brilliant thinker and organizer, she has been willing to work hard, take risks where there was hope and provide leadership by example where others (more understandable in regimes such as Hitler's and Stalin's, certainly not in a free country) might sit back and wait to pass judgment on the real work of those willing to stick their necks out for the common good.

Hers is a record of accomplishment on the behalf of others that we all should wish to have.

Would that her detractors, whose motives are more than suspect, be able to show in their own lives even a small percentage of such constructive thought and activity on behalf of their fellow man. Shame on them.

And shame on us if we allow such demagogy to rob us of the benefit of one of the best minds and hearts, one of the finest examples of personhood, this complex society has produced.

Eileen Tate Cline

Phoenix

Helping Farmers

Your Nov. 28 article about the failure of the Pennsylvania legislature to pass legislature controlling agricultural runoff implied that this defeat will blunt the momentum of farmers in Maryland in their efforts to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay.

Let me assure the citizens of our state that the agricultural community is strongly committed to our bay cleanup effort, and we have programs in place to accelerate these efforts.

Maryland farmers are playing and willing to continue to play a key role in preserving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.

During this past fiscal year alone, Maryland farmers installed some 15,000 best management practices protecting more than 104,000 acres of farm land and preventing an estimated 480,836 tons of soil from reaching waterways.

Currently, the Maryland Department of Agriculture, with the strong encouragement of Gov. William Donald Schaefer, is undertaking a major new initiative by developing and putting into place a comprehensive nutrient reduction strategy.

Our program has demonstrated that in a very short time nutrient management planning can result in considerable savings in fertilizer costs to farmers while at the same time reducing nutrient runoff in the Chesapeake Bay.

We are now in the process of certifying and licensing the private sector to develop state approved nutrient management plans for farmers.

As stewards of the land, the farmers of Maryland are pledged tcontrolling farm nutrients. We recognize that our quality of life depends on a strong commitment to reduce nutrients pollution.

Robert L. Walker

Annapolis

?3 The writer is Maryland secretary of agriculture.

Helping Farmers

Your Nov. 28 article about the failure of the Pennsylvania legislature to pass legislature controlling agricultural runoff implied that this defeat will blunt the momentum of farmers in Maryland in their efforts to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay.

Let me assure the citizens of our state that the agricultural community is strongly committed to our bay cleanup effort, and we have programs in place to accelerate these efforts.

Maryland farmers are playing and willing to continue to play a key role in preserving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries.

During this past fiscal year alone, Maryland farmers installed some 15,000 best management practices protecting more than 104,000 acres of farm land and preventing an estimated 480,836 tons of soil from reaching waterways.

Currently, the Maryland Department of Agriculture, with the strong encouragement of Gov. William Donald Schaefer, is undertaking a major new initiative by developing and putting into place a comprehensive nutrient reduction strategy.

Our program has demonstrated that in a very short time nutrient management planning can result in considerable savings in fertilizer costs to farmers while at the same time reducing nutrient runoff in the Chesapeake Bay.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.