Curley pulls away from South Carroll, gains final Mount Hebron tournament

December 30, 1992|By Rick Belz | Rick Belz,Staff Writer

For most of the first half, it was a sparring match with neither opponent gaining the upper hand. There were 12 lead changes.

But late in the first half and early in the third quarter, Archbishop Curley scored a knockdown with a 13-2 run and then held off a game fourth-quarter rally by South Carroll to win an opening-round game of the Mount Hebron Holiday Basketball Tournament.

The Cavaliers cut a 13-point deficit to 61-56 with 30 seconds left to play before Curley's Derek Wiley made a clinching layup.

The Friars' 64-56 victory put them into the final today against Mt. Hebron, a winner over Pikesville.

Both South Carroll and Curley played a pressing, up-tempo style and each team had some success with its press.

In the end, Curley simply shot a little better from the floor than SouthCarroll. The Friars were 28-for-63 and the Cavaliers were 24-for-63.

Poor free-throw shooting by Curley helped keep the game close, especially in the fourth quarter when the Friars missed seven of 12 attempts. They were 8-for-23 for the game.

"You have to give South Carroll credit because they didn't quit, rebounded well offensively, played hard and kept the pressure on until the end," Curley coach Dan Popera said. "I didn't feel comfortable until Wiley's layup."

OC Curley managed to break South Carroll's press in spurts and get

some easy baskets off it.

Dwight Byrd (17 points) made some crucial rebounds in the fourth period for Curley and led all scorers.

South Carroll made 19 turnovers and missed too many easy shots. Through three quarters, the Cavaliers were 14-for-43 from the floor.

But in the fourth quarter, trailing 47-34, South Carroll started hitting its shots.

"We played hard but not quite hard enough," Cavaliers coach Jim Carnes said. "This was a game we should have been able to win."

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