Two chaises suit mood of woman's room

INSIDE ADVICE

December 13, 1992|By Rose Bennett Gilbert | Rose Bennett Gilbert,Copley News Service

Q: We have a small morning room off the master bedroom that I want to make over just for me -- my husband has a den downstairs. I'm thinking of buying a chaise I've seen; it would make me feel just like Mme. Recamier, but I also need seats for friends when they visit.

Can I use regular armchairs with a chaise?

A: You could, but consider also an idea designer Rona Levine used when she created a personal room for a Long Island show house this spring.

Ms. Levine used not one but two matching chaises, side by side in front of the fireplace. Sofas or love seats you'd expect in any house, but two chaises gave her room the kind of je-ne-sais-quoi Mme. Recamier would have approved.

Chaises, by the way, have been enjoying a revival of late. Never mind that they date back to the ancient Greeks and Romans who, you must know, reclined on them during and after meals.

When French painter Jacques Louis David immortalized the aforementioned Mme. Recamier on her curvy chaise, it caught ** the popular imagination and has been with us ever since.

Q: Years ago as a student, I remember visiting a marvelous furniture museum in High Point, N.C. We are planning a trip South with our daughter, who is interested in interior design, and I'd like to find the museum again. Can you help me?

A: Yes, and with pleasure. What had been the individual dream of a single man, Sandy Bienenstock, the late publisher of Furniture World magazine, has now grown into the full-fledged Furniture Discovery Center on West Green Street in High Point, the undisputed furniture capital of the world.

Billed as the only museum of its kind anywhere, the museum has demonstrations on how furniture is made today, plus a splendid library and collection of miniature rooms by the late artist-historian Eugene Kupjack, who created many of the famous Thorne rooms-in-miniature at the Art Institute of Chicago.

;/ For more information, phone (919) 887-3876.

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