Yuri Temirkanov to conduct at the MeyerhoffYuri Temirkanov...

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December 13, 1992|By Stephen Wigler

Yuri Temirkanov to conduct at the Meyerhoff

Yuri Temirkanov is one of the world's hottest conductors, and Baltimore music lovers have been waiting years to hear him. Thursday and Friday (at 8:15 p.m.) and Saturday (at 11 a.m.) he finally arrives at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. Temirkanov, the music director of his country's greatest orchestra (formerly the Leningrad, now the St. Petersburg Philharmonic) will conduct a program that consists of Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade" and Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5. These are warhorses -- tired in most performances -- that almost every listener knows, but Temirkanov is likely to ride a winning race in each piece. Tickets for the evening concerts are $15-$40; $14-$21 for the morning concert. For further information, call (401) 783-8000. Caleb Tsai is one of Baltimore's best pianists, with a special gift for tackling immensely difficult works. This afternoon at 3 at the Walters Art Gallery, Tsai, who took a top prize at the William Kapell Competition a few years back, will play Debussy's "Suite Bergamasque," Schubert's opus 90 Impromptus and two Liszt pieces. The Liszt -- the composer's transcriptions of Wagner's "The Flying Dutchman" and Verdi's "Rigoletto" -- should be particularly interesting. They are both tours de force of dazzling pianism that listeners can expect Tsai to play brilliantly. Admission to the concert in the museum's Graham Auditorium is free with gallery admission -- $4 for adults, free for children 18 and younger. For more information, call (410) 547-9000.

Stephen Wigler In the music events of the holiday season, Robert Twynham's "Magnificat," which will be performed today at 5:30 p.m. at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5300 N. Charles St., deserves special mention. Twynham, director of music and organist at the cathedral, wrote the piece on a Baltimore Choral Arts Society commission in 1980, and it has since been performed from coast to coast. The composer, who studied at the Peabody Conservatory and with the great Oliver Messiaen in Paris, says the work reflects his lifetime immersion in the world of French music. The concert is free, but contributions will be accepted. Call (410) 433-8803 for details.

Stephen Wigler

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