Annapolitan atop One-Design high point standings

SAILING

December 09, 1992|By NANCY NOYES

The high point standings for the One-Design Division became available late last week.

Under the auspices of the Chesapeake Bay Yacht Racing Association, annual high point standings reflect a sailor's performance on a season-long basis.

The One-Design Division has a unique manner of determining high point standings, though, like the scoring systems for the Cruising One-Design and Handicap divisions, it is based on the ratio between actual performance and ideal performance.

There are six geographic One-Design areas in the Chesapeake Bay area, and a competitor's score is multiplied by a bonus factor of 1.25 if he competes in more than one area during the season.

Each skipper is awarded two points for starting an event and one point for every boat beaten or tied in the final standings of that race or regatta. After eight races or regattas, a competitor's worst score is discarded. This is multiplied by the bonus factor, if applicable, then divided by the number of points it would have been possible to win, had a sailor won every event started, plus 10 percent of the total number of starters in that class that year.

Figuring who will be the overall champion of the One-Design Division is relatively easy, once the high point scoring is done. In this division, the winner of the Corinthian Cask Overall One-Design Division trophy is that sailor with the highest high point score.

This year, the award most likely will go to Geoffrey Schneider, a young sailor who has impressively and consistently competed in the El Toro dinghy class, winning high point four years in a row, 1987 to 1990, as well as the Junior Single-Handed class in 1986 and the Junior Double-Handed class in 1990.

Schneider, son of William and Susan Schneider of Annapolis and a member of Severn Sailing Association, earned the Corinthian Cask as the top one-design sailor in 1990.

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