County personnel ordinance under revision Employees meet to offer input

October 26, 1992|By Kerry O'Rourke | Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer

Carroll employees may give input on modifications to the promotions policy and other proposed changes to the county's personnel ordinance at a public hearing at 3 p.m. tomorrow in Room 300A of the County Office Building.

Many of the proposed changes are minor and would make the ordinance -- written about 12 years ago -- easier to read, Director of Human Resources and Personnel Services Jimmie L. Saylor said.

Mrs. Saylor; Bev Billingslea, assistant department director; and assistant county attorney Laurell Taylor helped draft the changes.

County employees have had an opportunity to review the proposed changes, Mrs. Saylor said. Some have submitted written comments about proposed changes to the promotions policy, she said.

The proposal says if an employee is promoted, his former job will be kept open for three months. If the employee receives an unsatisfactory review in his new position after a three-month probationary period, he may return to his former position.

The ordinance currently says an employee is on probation for six months if he is promoted, and his position is not kept open, Mrs. Saylor said.

The proposed change was designed to encourage promotion, she said. Keeping the position open for three months should not cause a hardship on departments because hiring a new employee usually takes two months, she said.

Some supervisors oppose the change, she noted.

The proposed changes also reflect a merger of the management and general pay scales, which took effect July 1. The county now has one pay scale with 15 grades.

Another proposed change adds a chapter on equal opportunity compliance, which says the county does not discriminate against any employee on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age or disability. It also says the county does not tolerate sexual harassment.

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