Brooklyn Park steps out to yard sales

October 12, 1992|By Angela Gambill | Angela Gambill,Staff Writer

It was Yard Sale Heaven Saturday in Greater Brooklyn Park.

From a Belle Grove community sale, held in the parking lot of Bingo World, to dozens of individual family sales around the neighborhood, the day gave residents and passers by many chances to root for that perfect treasure.

"How much is this necklace?" a woman asked Donna Lombardi, 27, whose husband set up their table on the Bingo World parking lot at 7 a.m.

"Twenty-five cents," she replied.

"SOLD!" cried the woman, beaming. "I used to sell Sarah Coventry [jewelry]. Good stuff."

Delores Impallaria, president of the Belle Grove Improvement Association, rejoiced that the weather had turned pleasant for the community sale.

In this fourth such sale, individuals set up their own tables and kept their own profits, she said. But the joint event sponsored neighborhood togetherness.

Families stopped their cars to root through tables of dinnerware, clothing, games, lawn furniture and dozens of knick-knacks.

Stephanie Herb, 9, persuaded her parents to buy her a purple sweat shirt in admirable shape, then explained, "I like to shop anywhere."

"She means she likes to spend money," inserted her mother, Linda.

The family had brought two puppies to the sale to find homes for them, but Stephanie had other items on her agenda. "This is pretty!" she shrieked, diving into a box of blouses.

Her father, Joseph, held his head. "I'm going home before I run out of money!" he joked.

At another table on a nearby street, Daniel Soustek demonstrated his "Spinners".

He makes the toys from two-liter plastic soda bottles, cutting and then painting them in orange and black.

"It's Orioles colors, or Halloween, or just fall," he said.

Customers were impressed. "That's a lot of work!" said one.

Mr. Soustek's chest expanded. "You're not kidding," he said. "I could paint four a day, that's about it."

Walter Peters, 24, decided to take four children -- his daughter and three relatives -- to the park, but got waylaid by the sales.

"It's nice, having everybody out getting rid of old stuff," he said, looking around. "It's a nice community thing, and you never know what you might find."

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