Ribbon-cutting is held for Lemmon Tree Lane

REAL ESTATE NOTES

October 04, 1992|By Edward Gunts | Edward Gunts,Staff writer

Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the Baltimore Corporation for Housing Partnerships cut the ribbon yesterday for Lemmon Tree Lane, 17 town houses in the 1700 block of Lemmon St. that have been restored for low- and moderate-income residents.

The non-profit housing partnership renovated the 100-year-old houses for sale to families earning as little as $18,000 a year, while keeping their exteriors as close as possible to their original appearance. For eligible buyers, monthly payments begin at $438.

Besides visiting the town houses, Mayor Schmoke toured the recently renovated Steuart Hill Elementary School near Union Square. All of the work -- including new study spaces and the reconfiguration of an outdoor area that had been a hangout for drug dealers -- was donated by the housing partnership, Signet Bank/Maryland and the contracting firm of Thomas P. Harkins Inc.

"This project was a natural for us," said Thomas S. Bozzuto, president of the Housing Partnerships. "Even though we're a non-profit [homebuilder], we want to work with Baltimore neighborhoods in ways that go beyond housing needs."

Additional information about the town houses is available from the housing partnership at 889-4665.

Preservation preview

Baltimore Heritage, a local preservation advocacy group, has created a poster and 1993 calendar featuring 12 "endangered buildings" throughout the city, such as the Southern Hotel and the American Brewery.

Entitled "Baltimore's Vanishing Perspectives," the two-color poster will be unveiled during a walking tour of 18th century Fells Point architecture, starting at 854 S. Bond St. Oct. 11 at 2 p.m.

Baltimore Heritage created the poster to focus public attention on the plight of endangered properties in Baltimore, according to David H. Gleason, a local architect and chairman of the group's preservation planning committee. The poster will be sold at various events or through the organization, which can be reached by calling 366-7724.

The walking tour is the first in a series of events focusing on endangered landmarks in Baltimore and will include a reception at the Robert Long House on South Ann Street.

Baltimore County

Baltimore County's new development guidelines will be discussed at the Oct. 13 meeting of the Baltimore chapter of the American Institute of Architects, 11 1/2 W. Chase St. Guest speakers will be James Dieter, director of the county's Department of Environment Protection, and David Fields, director of the county's planning department. The meeting will run from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The cost is $5 per person. Reservations can be made by calling the AIA office at 625-2585.

Around the region:

* Stanley Heuisler, president of the organization that is building the Christopher Columbus Center for Marine Research and Exploration on Inner Harbor Piers 5 and 6, will discuss the project during a "Business over Breakfast" presentation sponsored by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore. The presentation will be given Oct. 21 from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at Harrison's Pier 5 restaurant. The cost is $15 for non-members, free for members. For reservations, call 244-1030 by Oct. 16.

* The University of Maryland Medical Systems will open a new outpatient pharmacy at 22 S. Greene St., within the lobby of the University of Maryland Hospital, tomorrow at 1 p.m. Alexander Key and Associates was the designer, and Hallmark Pharmacy is the operator.

* Life Care Services Corp. has appointed Diane Hanson to be move-in coordinator for Blakehurst, a $40 million retirement community under construction near Towson and due to open in mid-1993. Ms. Hanson was the move-in coordinator for two other Life Care communities, North Oaks near Owings Mills and Ginger Cove near Annapolis.

* Olde Colonial Realty, of 7200 North Point Road in Edgemere, has affiliated with Century 21 of the Mid-Atlantic States and will be known as Century 21 Olde Colonial Realty. It is operated by Jim Gay and his son, James Gay III.

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