Lie down in luxuryPalais Royal linens have been available...

ON THE HOME FRONT

September 27, 1992|By Elizabeth Large | Elizabeth Large,Staff Writer

Lie down in luxury

Palais Royal linens have been available through fine stores and catalogs, but the French-owned company didn't have its own retail stores in this country until last November, when Palais Royal came to Greenspring Station. It's done so well selling luxury linens for the bed, bath and table that a new store has just opened in Bethesda, and another is scheduled to open Thursday in Annapolis.

There's a new collection every spring, but the dye lots stay the same, so that five years from now you can come back and buy pieces that go with what you already have.

Palais Royal believes its customers should change their bedroom linens often for a new look -- pastels in the summer, for instance, and jewel tones in the winter. To encourage that, the store holds a drawing every season for a complete bed ensemble -- one is going on now. Just stop by and register.

Palais Royal is located in Greenspring Station, Lutherville; Wildwood Shopping Center, Bethesda; and, starting Thursday, 80 Maryland Ave., Annapolis.

You've seen fabric-covered picture frames before, but none quite like these. Instead of padded cardboard, these are handcrafted from wood and covered with designer fabrics. Some have hangers with tassels or bows; all are easel-backed.

Julie Craig says she's selling them almost as fast as she makes them. Some customers even bring in their own fabric to match their decor. One of her most popular designs is a two- or three-tiered frame that could hold photos of all your children together.

Prices are $23 for frames for a 4-x-5-inch picture, $29 for a 5 x 7and $34 for an 8 x 10. The frames can be bought exclusively in this area at Ms. Craig's new store in Towson Commons, called Whimsicals. Whimsicals is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, noon to 6 p.m. Sundays. Call (410) 825-2837 for more information.

It sounds academic: a symposium on the influence of classicism on 19th century American architecture, decorative arts and landscaping. But the speakers are internationally known authorities in their fields; and Lily Ott, director of Johns Hopkins University's Evergreen House, describes them as "delightful -- funny, a little bit zany, scholarly but entertaining."

The day-long program will be held this Wednesday at Evergreen. The speakers include Wendell D. Garrett, editor-at-large and publisher of Antiques and senior vice president and director of museum services for Sotheby's; Elisabeth Donaghy Garrett, author and director of Sotheby's educational services department; and Eleanor C. Weller, co-author of The Golden Age of American Gardens.

"It's going to be a fun day," says Ms. Ott. "Some food for thought and some fantastic slides. Anybody interested in gardening is going to be open-mouthed over Eleanor Weller's slides." PTC Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday at Evergreen, 4545 N. Charles St. The fee of $40 ($35 for Evergreen members) covers the lectures, morning coffee, lunch and afternoon tea. For further information, call (410) 516-0341.

You love your cat, but you don't love the way he's torn up your dining room chairs with his claws. Mical Wilmoth can help you out: If it's a woven seat, she can repair it.

She calls herself The Chairperson, and her specialties are hand caning, fiber rush, wicker and porch weave. Those of us who have those good-looking Scandinavian chairs with the woven seats are finding that they do wear out; The Chairperson can take them on and make them look like new. Most seat repairs cost between $35 and $65, certainly cheaper than replacing the chair.

Ms. Wilmoth, amazingly enough, taught herself from a book. She polished her skills in an antique shop and has been in business for herself for the last 16 years.

Ms. Wilmoth works out of her home in Towson. To set up an appointment, call (410) 825-9344.

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