Schools in California and Hawaii help surfers catch waves more effectively

TRAVEL Q&A

September 20, 1992|By New York Times News Service

Q: Are there any surfing schools on the West Coast or in Hawaii?

A: In San Onofre, Calif., about halfway between Los Angeles and San Diego, Paskowitz Surfing Summer Camp offers weeklong sessions between mid-June and late August. Participants can be any age and range from beginners to experts.

The camp was founded in 1972 by Dorian Paskowitz (he is now the camp doctor and his wife the girls' counselor) and is staffed by his eight sons and one daughter.

Participants camp at San Onofre State Park in San Clemente, staying in platform tents with cots. Students surf at San Onofre Beach with slow, rolling waves ideal for beginners, or walk to Churches, Trestles or other challenging areas.

The Paskowitz family does the teaching, but there are guest instructors who may include the professional surfers Christian Fletcher, Matt Archbold and Dino Andino. The cost is $800 a week, which includes the camping, all meals, 24-hour supervision for children and use of surfboards and other equipment. There are 25 campers in attendance at one time.

More information: Paskowitz Surfing Summer Camp, P.O. Box 522, San Clemente, Calif. 92674; (714) 240-6111.

In Hawaii, surfing education can be found by the lesson. In Honolulu, one teacher is Nancy Emerson, formerly the women's surfing champion. She teaches at beaches near Diamond Head, and students may be any age and any level of experience.

Group lessons -- two to five students -- are $45 for one hour and $65 for two hours. Private lessons are $80 for one hour and $110 for two hours. For two-hour private lessons on five consecutive days, the cost is $400. More information: Nancy Emerson, (808) 377-2337.

Q: Do you know of agencies that can arrange a rental of a house or apartment in or near Florence next summer?

A: Here are some agencies that represent house and apartment rentals in Italy, including the Florence area.

BTC Prices are given for one week -- the usual minimum rental period -- for the summer. The rates may not include charges for such things as electricity and gas or linen and towel rentals; be sure to ask.

* Cuendet U.S.A., 165 Chestnut St., Allendale, N.J. 07401; (201) 327-2333, represents about 1,500 properties in Italy. In the center of Florence, the company has a one-bedroom apartment for $746 and a one-bedroom house set in a courtyard for $711.

About 15 miles south, in a castle divided into 50 apartments with two pools and a cafe, apartments are $527 for a studio to $2,000 for four bedrooms.

* Interhome, 124 Little Falls Road, Fairfield, N.J. 07004, (201) 882-6864, represents about 3,000 properties in Italy. A three-bedroom house about seven miles north of Florence is $1,668.

Three apartments on a farm about 12 miles northeast of Florence share a pool: A three-bedroom is $1,163, another is $1,275 and a four-bedroom apartment is $1,468. A one-bedroom cottage five miles south of Florence is $833.

* Italian Rentals, 3801 Ingomar St. N.W., Washington 20015, (202) 244-5345, represents about 500 properties in Italy. A one-bedroom apartment in Florence is $910 and a two-bedroom apartment, with terrace, is $1,500. A house for four about 30 miles south starts at $1,180.

* Italian Villa Rentals, P.O. Box 1145, Bellevue, Wash. 98009; (206) 827-3694, represents about 650 properties in Italy. In an apartment building in Florence, a one-bedroom unit is $890 and a two-bedroom is $1,550. On the outskirts, one-bedroom apartments in restored villas are $1,150 to $1,350, and a three-bedroom house is $750 to $1,450.

* Vacanze in Italia, P.O. Box 297, Falls Village, Conn. 06031, (800) 533-5405, handles about 500 properties in Italy. A basic studio apartment in Florence starts at $600; a one-bedroom apartment in the city starts at $800 or $900 a week, with most around $1,000. Outside the city, a one-bedroom cottage is as low as $400.

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