Barbara McClintock, 90, a pioneering geneticist and a 1983...

DEATHS

September 04, 1992

Barbara McClintock, 90, a pioneering geneticist and a 1983 winner of the Nobel Prize for her research on Indian corn, died Wednesday in Huntington, N.Y. She discovered that genes can move from one area on the chromosomes to another, a finding that now helps molecular biologists identify, locate and study genes. The Cornell-trained scientist was named a fellow of the MacArthur Foundation, which provided her with $60,000 a year for life. She was working as recently as four months before her death, putting in seven-day weeks and sometimes 16-hour days. She was only the third woman to win the Nobel Prize for solo work, the other two being Marie Curie of France in 1911 for discoving radium and polomium and Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin of England in 1964 for the structure of penicillin. When Ms. McClintock won the Nobel Prize, she said, "It may seem unfair . . . to reward a person for having so much pleasure, over the years, asking the maize plant to solve specific problems and then watching its responses."

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.