WMC to screen films on British history

August 30, 1992|By Staff Report

WESTMINSTER -- Three of the most famous episodes in British history and their subsequent depiction on film will be the focus of the Western Maryland College History Department's Fall Film Series.

All of the films -- "The Private Life of Henry VIII," "That Hamilton Woman," and "Hope and Glory" -- are free and open to the public. They will be screened in the Decker College Center Pub )) and Grille.

"The Private Life of Henry VIII" presents the intimate side of the monarch with a great deal of humor. A virtuoso performance by Charles Laughton earned him an Academy Award for best actor, while the actresses portraying hisnumerous wives, including Merle Oberon and Elsa Lanchester, are also outstanding. This 1933 film was directed by Alexander Korda. It will be shown on Monday, Sept. 14, at 7:30 p.m.

One of the great love stories of all time is that of Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton. Produced during the height of the war in 1941, Mr. Korda's "That Hamilton Woman" is a dynamic retelling of the war between England and Napolean's France as well as a revealing look at the affairs of the principals. Starring Laurence Olivier as Lord Nelson and Vivian Leigh as Emma Hamilton, the film is said to have been Winston Churchill's favorite. It will be shown on Monday, Oct. 19, at 7:30 p.m.

"Hope and Glory," nominated for an Academy Award for best picture, may be director John Boorman's most personal film. Based on his childhood recollections of the London Blitz, it opens just before the declaration of war in 1939. The hero, Bill Bohan, finds his life turned upside down when his father registers for military service. It doesn't take long for the business-as-usual attitude of British school and family life to be overrun by the chaos and wonder of a city under siege. Though this 1987 film is ostensibly very British, its themes are universal. "Hope and Glory" will be shown on Monday, Nov. 9, at 7:30 p.m.

Additional information: WMC History Department, 857-2410, or the Office of Public Information, 857-2290.

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