1804

THEO LIPPMAN JR.

August 28, 1992|By Theo Lippman Jr.

This is the 52nd presidential election.

The fifth was held in 1804, under a new constitutional amendment that required slates of president and vice president. Jefferson replaced his problem vice president, Aaron Burr, with George Clinton.

This Democratic-Republican slate was nominated by a caucus of members of Congress. Clinton was chosen on the first nominating roll call in American history.

The Federalists were were so few in number by 1804 that the party's leaders chose a slate informally: Charles C. Pinckney and Rufus King.

The party was regarded as little more than a fringe, regional organization. Some of its New England members wanted their states to secede and form a new nation.

This was in part because of Jefferson's immense popularity. In his first term he had purchased Louisiana, cut taxes, kept the nation at peace and enjoyed a strong national economy.

Jefferson won every state but Connecticut and Delaware (two of Maryland's 11 electors voted for the Federalist slate).

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