UMBC stocks soccer Players of the YearElliott transfers...

August 26, 1992|By Paul McMullen | Paul McMullen,Staff Writer

UMBC stocks soccer Players of the Year

Elliott transfers, joins Kremer

J.J. Kremer isn't the only Baltimore Sun soccer Player of the Year from Calvert Hall at UMBC.

Kremer was recognized as the area's top high school player a year ago, and he's expected to be one of three first-year starters for UMBC. The most accomplished newcomer in camp, however, is Rob Elliott, who started for two-plus seasons at Loyola before struggling academically. He'll be eligible to play for the Retrievers in 1993.

Elliott was the area's Player of the Year for Calvert Hall in 1988, and collected 22 goals and 23 assists over the next two seasons for the Greyhounds, earning South Atlantic Region all-star status both years. Moved to midfield last season, he had one goal through 11 games, when he was suspended by Bill Sento because of academic shortcomings.

Academically dismissed from Loyola, Elliott took courses at Essex Community College last spring. He's enrolled full time at UMBC and will be on the sidelines there this season, starting with Saturday's (8 p.m.) scrimmage against Old Dominion that will inaugurate the new lights at UMBC Stadium.

In addition to an overhauled schedule revolving around its new membership in the Big South Conference, UMBC coach Pete Caringi's duties this fall will include preparations for the National Soccer Coaches Association of America convention in Baltimore Jan. 12-16. Caringi is coordinating a local committee involved in organizing the gathering.

Loyola will have some eyes at UMBC on Saturday, as the Greyhounds unveil their best freshman class since 1985 when they open Sept. 5 at ODU. Sento has only two seniors, but he got some experience back when sophomore forward-midfielder Rich Aftoora showed up in camp last week. Aftoora didn't attend Loyola last spring and was ready to transfer, but he'll be playing for the Greyhounds again as soon as a minor knee injury heals.

Bill Stromberg caught 258 passes for Johns Hopkins from 1978-81, but that record didn't seem so unreachable last fall after Gary Campbell debuted for the Blue Jays.

Along with Jelani Rucker, a defensive lineman from Poly, Campbell was one of the most impressive freshmen at Hopkins. A wide receiver, Campbell caught 52 passes for 610 yards and three touchdowns. He wasn't practicing yesterday when Jim Margraff opened his third camp, however, because a chronic shoulder injury dating back to his high school days at Berwick, Pa., has forcedCampbell to quit the sport.

The Blue Jays should improve after consecutive 5-4-1 seasons. Salisbury State, another of the state's Division III teams, has won just four games the past three seasons and will get an indicator of its rebuilding under Joe Rotellini when the Sea Gulls come to Towson State for a controlled scrimmage Sept. 2 (7 p.m.).

State's best newcomer

The unofficial state cross country championships will be held at UMBC Oct. 10. Navy's men will be testing the site of the NCAA championships that day by competing in the Indiana Invitational, and in the absence of the Mids' Greg Keller, list Bernard Kitur as the early state favorite.

Kitur, a 20-year-old with four years of eligibility remaining, is the latest Kenyan to enter Mount St. Mary's. He doesn't have the credentials of Peter Rono or the Cheruiyot brothers, but he does have a 1,500-meter best in the 3-minute, 50-second range.

A few more Patriot games

As long as Navy continues to opt for the Heptagonal championships in cross country, indoor track and outdoor track, the Mids will lag far behind in the Presidents' Cup race that determines all-sports supremacy in the Patriot League.

The addition of baseball next spring will raise Navy'participation to eight teams in the Patriot League, but Bucknell, Colgate, Lafayette and Lehigh have 22 teams or more racking up points. Navy athletic director Jack Lengyel said there is a proposal to create an additional system that would rank the average, not a point total, of members' performance.

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