Yugoslavia's Deadly Disintegration

August 14, 1992

A map graphic of Yugoslavia published in yesterday's editions of The Sun incorrectly stated the population of Kosovo and Vojvodina, two autonomous provinces in Serbia. The population of Kosovo is 2 million; Vojvodina, 1.9 million.

+ The Sun regrets the errors.

Yugoslavia was a communist country from 1945 to 1990 when the Communist Party was stripped of its power. Disintegration of the country began last year and 50,000 people are believed to have died and more than 2 million driven from their homes

June, 1991 -- Slovenia and Croatia each declare independence. Serbia resists the breakup, briefly in Slovenia, but forcefully in Croatia where 12 per cent of the population is Serb. Serb forces now occupy a third of Croatia, under a ceasefire monitored by 14,000 UN troops.

FOR THE RECORD - CORRECTION

September 1991 -- Macedonia declares independence, but is not recognized by major powers because of objections from neighboring Greece. Kosovo, a predominantly Albanian autonomous province within Serbia, declares independence but remains under Serbian rule.

March 1992 -- Bosnia-Herzegovina's majority muslim and Croat population votes for independence. Serbs who make up a third of the population refuse to participate. Serbian forces, supported by federal army from Serbia begin the siege of Sarajevo and the methodical "purification" of once multi-ethnic areas.

April 1992 -- Montenegro votes to join Serbia in what becomes the rump state of Yugoslavia.

July 1992 -- Reports emerge of atrocities against Muslims in Bosnia. Croatians and Muslims also charged with atrocities, drawing world condemnation of Serbian advances. European and U.N. embargoes invoked without success. So far, approximately 8,000 people have been killed in the fighting in Bosnia and about 1 million have been left homeless.

August 13 -- U.N. Security Council adopts resolution threatening "all measures necessary" to bring humanitarian aid to the area and to restore peace.

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