Man nabbed in use of fake MTA passA 27-year-old Baltimore...

MARYLAND NEWSWATCH

August 14, 1992

MARYLAND STATE — Man nabbed in use of fake MTA pass

A 27-year-old Baltimore man was arrested yesterday in the use of a forged Mass Transit Administration bus pass.

Carlton Cobb, of the 3900 block of Barrington Road, was arrested by MTA police and charged with theft after he allegedly boarded a bus at Garrison Boulevard and Hilton Street and used the phony pass to get a ride. Mr. Cobb is employed by by the Baltimore Sun as a mailroom trainee, according to a company official.

MTA officials say they expect more such forged bus passes to turn up.

Dianna Rosborough, an MTA spokeswoman, said that's becausCobb's fake bus pass was traced by serial number to Thomas Jefferson Miller, 36, a Govans resident who was arrested last week for reproducing bus passes on a color photocopying machine.

Mr. Miller was turned in by an employee of an office supply store who saw him copying an August pass last Thursday.

A search of Mr. Miller's home at the 600 block of WoodbournAvenue turned up various copies of monthly bus passes dating back as far as June of last year. The passes are valued at $38.50 each.

Ms. Rosborough said the MTA has recently changed the design of the bus passes to make them harder to duplicate.

"It's not a common thing," she said. "The moral of the story i that you should only buy passes from authorized outlets."

A law preventing the Prince George's County executive and council members from accepting direct political contributions from developers is illegal, attorneys for Parris Glendening argued yesterday.

But an attorney for the state said the General Assembly was within its rights to adopt the legislation earlier this year.

The law bars zoning applicants with pending cases in the county from making contributions to the election campaigns of the executive and council. It also stops council members from voting on zoning cases involving anyone who has contributed to their campaigns in the previous three years.

However, developers can still contribute to county campaigns if they donate the money to a slate of candidates. Developers are the largest contributors to county election campaigns.

The Prince George's ethics amendment was attached to a Montgomery County zoning law by the 1992 legislature.

Mr. Glendenning has begun a campaign for the 1994 Democratic gubernatorial election. He contends that the law was backed by his longtime political rival, state Senate President Thomas V. "Mike" Miller Jr., D-Prince George's, who supports Lt. Gov. Melvin A. Steinberg in the 1994 gubernatorial election. Mr. Miller has denied it.

Anne Arundel County

In January, a Pasadena man allegedly shot his estranged wife twice in the parking lot of a Pasadena shopping mall.

Yesterday, his wife shot back.

Mary Maxine Copeland filed suit in county Circuit Court seeking $7 million in damages from her husband, Arthur, for allegedly shooting her on her 59th birthday at the Marley Station mall.

Mr. Copeland, of the 1200 block of Rock Hill Road in Pasadena, is being held at the county detention center awaiting trial. He is charged with assault with intent to murder in the Jan. 17 shooting.

Police said the woman was walking to her blue Oldsmobile Calais near the entrance of the Hecht's department store about 6 p.m., when her husband approached her and said, "I have a birthday present for you."

Mr. Copeland pistol-whipped her face, then shot her in the side, police said.

The suit also names Mr. Copeland's son, Robert Copeland, separately as a co-defendant, claiming that while Mrs. Copeland was in the hospital, Robert went to her home and took property belonging to Mrs. Copeland and her estranged husband.

The suit seeks an additional $100,000 in compensatory damages and $400,000 in punitive damages from Robert Copeland.

Carroll County

Four large maple trees, on the property of Western Maryland College in the 100 block of Pennsylvania Ave. in Westminster, were unceremoniously chopped to the ground Tuesday.

The trees, which provided shade for both students and neighbors, were cut down, chopped up and carted away to the dismay of several residents who live just across the street from the college and have enjoyed them for many years.

Walter Bartlett, who is recovering from a recent heart attack and still carrying a monitor at his side, said the trees not only provided shade but helped dissipate some of the carbon monoxide from cars and trucks on the busy city street.

Chris Hart, public information officer at the college, said "the trees were badly decayed and that numerous large branches had fallen." He added, "The college had checked with a local tree-trimming company who also checked the four maples and suggested they be removed."

Mr. Hart said the policy of the college is to plant at least one tree for each one cut down and that would be done in this case.

College officials will ask the city for suggestions as to the best type of tree for replacement, Mr. Hart said.

Major reconstruction is planned for that section of Pennsylvania Avenue in the next several years.

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