Better late than never for 2 winners Last-minute entrants prevail in Annapolis

August 10, 1992|By Tara Finnegan | Tara Finnegan,Staff Writer

ANNAPOLIS -- Two last-minute entrants were the first across the finish line yesterday in the inaugural Bud Light Annapolis Triathlon.

Troy Jacobson of Hunt Valley took the men's open division and the state championship in 1 hour, 39 minutes, and Dolly Ginter of Columbia captured the women's open and state title with her time of 1:49.05.

The winners were two of about 700 athletes clad in spandex running togs and swimsuits who gathered on the campus of St. John's College for 1.5 kilometers of swimming, 36 kilometers of cycling and a 10K run.

Both Jacobson and Ginter qualified for the U.S. National Triathlon Team last weekend in Cleveland by finishing in the top 10 in their age group in the National City Corporation Amateur Championship. Both will compete as amateurs in the 1992 Triathlon World Championships in Ontario, Canada, next month.

The world championships has an Olympic format (1.5K swim, 40K bike, 10K run), which is similar to yesterday's race.

"I used today as a training race for the worlds. I didn't really rest up for this race," Jacobson said. "In fact, I just called the race director two days ago to see if there were any spots."

In addition to her 20-miles-per week training schedule, Ginter, 29, is a substitute teacher and takes graduate courses. She plans to become a physical therapist.

Jacobson, 23, has been competing in triathlons for four years.

"I prefer to do races longer than the Olympic distances since I'm sort of a weak swimmer," he said. "The longer races give me an opportunity to catch the stronger swimmers because proportionally, the swim is shorter."

The cycling portion of yesterday's triathlon was 3 kilometers shorter than planned because military officials objected to the original route, which included a restricted area of the Naval Academy, organizers said.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.