WITH tickets to Orioles games at the new ballpark...

Salmagundi

August 04, 1992

WITH tickets to Orioles games at the new ballpark regularly sold out, Congressman Wayne Owens of Utah has come up with a fund-raiser idea that is sure to be a hit: dinner in the Warehouse Restaurant at the park, schmoozing with the ballplayers, and tickets to view the game between the locals and the Detroit Tigers tonight.

Tickets for the hot dogs-and-nachos affair range from $150 (minimum contribution) on up, so it won't be a bargain. But it sure beats a night of rubber chicken and campaign oratory in a hotel ballroom.

Staffers of the Democrat who is running for the Senate said about 125 people are expected. A number of them are planning to bring their children to see the game and to mingle with any Baltimore players who show up.

Pre-game parties at the new facility are extremely popular, says Patty Righter, banquet sales manager for the Orioles. Several political candidates have booked the banquet room, the Bullpen or the Terrace.

You don't necessarily need political pull to hold a catered affair at the facility, but it is already booked for every home game this baseball season (with the League Playoffs and World Series dates being held open, just in case.) In fact, some people have already reserved the room for 1993, Ms. Righter noted.

For a pre-game party, rent on the banquet room is free as long as the menu is selected from the list offered by ARA Leisure Services, the concessionaire. But obtaining enough tickets for the game afterward is the responsibility of the host.

The Owens campaign says the Orioles game idea initially popped up because of the politician's former ties to Larry Lucchino, the Orioles ballclub president.

Mr. Lucchino, who worked as an aide to the congressman in Washington in the 1970s, is scheduled to attend. But Nate Landow, the former Maryland Democratic Party chairman, is official host for the evening.

Under the existing contract, the Orioles collect the money for events scheduled in conjunction with a ball game, the Maryland Stadium Authority pockets proceeds from nongame-day affairs.

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