Lelia H. HynsonCollege board memberLelia Hodson Hynson...

OBITUARIES

August 02, 1992

Lelia H. Hynson

College board member

Lelia Hodson Hynson, who was active in the Scarsdale, N.Y., community and a former member of the board of Washington College, died July 15 of heart failure at her Scarsdale home at the age of 93.

The former Lelia Hodson was a native of Baltimore. Her father started a loan company that was a predecessor of the Beneficial Corp. in Wilmington, Del.

Reared in Snow Hill, the 1918 graduate of the Baldwin School had been a member of the original board of the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art in Laurel, Miss., named for her first husband, who died in 1921.

Her second husband, James N. Hynson, a stockbroker, died in 1944.

In addition to serving on the boards of the Westchester County Council of Social Agencies and the Scarsdale Public Library, she was a charter member of the Junior League of Scarsdale and active in other groups there. She also had served on the board of Washington College in Chestertown, which awarded her an honorary degree. The national Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of New York gave her an award for meritorious service.

She is survived by three daughters, Sally Hopkins of Baltimore and Southwest Harbor, Maine; Anne Hynson of Scarsdale and Mary Thuroczy, of Hampton, N.J.; eight grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.

Services were July 17 at All Hallows Episcopal Church in Snow Hill.

The family suggested memorial contributions could be made to Washington College or the Lauren Rogers Museum.

Jerry D. Kiracofe

Agency founder, director

Services for Jerry D. Kiracofe, founder and executive director of a non-profit agency to provide staff training and evaluation of programs serving the disabled, will be at 3 this afternoon at St. John's Episcopal Church, 9120 Frederick Road in Ellicott City.

Mr. Kiracofe, who was 44 and lived in Columbia, died Wednesday at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center of complications to injuries from a fall while hiking near Thurmont June 20.

In 1978, he started the Human Services Institute Inc., and since 1986 he had served as full-time executive director of the institute, which emphasizes independence, individual treatment and the rights of physically and mentally challenged people. It has been working on a program giving individual support to a group of homeless men in Baltimore.

From 1979 until 1986, he also served as executive director of the Calvert County Association for Retarded Citizens in Prince Frederick.

He moved to the Baltimore area in 1970 and did construction work for two years in a training program of Ryland Homes.

In 1972, he changed careers and began working for the Baltimore Association for Retarded Citizens, where he became director of residential services before leaving the agency in 1977.

He was a member of the Maryland State Planning Council on rTC Developmental Disabilities and the Howard County Leadership Forum.

The native of Hamilton, Ohio, was reared in Eaton, Ohio. He was a 1970 graduate of Manchester College in Richmond, Ind., and earned a master's degree from the University of Maryland's University College.

He also had traveled in Asia in the 1970s and in South America on a tour with the Manchester College basketball team on which he played. More recently, he had played basketball in a $l Columbia recreation league and coached his elder son's team in the Howard County Youth Program. He also was fond of camping and music.

He is survived by two sons, Philip Parkhurst Kiracofe and Andrew David Kiracofe, both of Columbia and Ellicott City; a daughter, Jessica Elkins Kiracofe of Ellicott City and Columbia; his father, Alfred Charles Kiracofe of Eaton; a brother, Jan Frederick Kiracofe of Towson; four sisters, Jolene Bouslog of Sarasota, Fla., Jennifer Brierly of Nashville, Tenn., Joyce Wallace of Port Charlotte, Fla., and Julie Behnken of Columbia; and many nieces and nephews.

George C. Martak

Former distance runner

George C. Martak, who was active in his youth as a distance runner in Baltimore, died July 13 at Franklin Square Hospital of a respiratory illness.

Mr. Martak, who was 76 and lived on Bayner Road in Essex, retired 10 years ago after working for many years as a supervisor for the Bendix Radio Division of Allied Signal Inc. in South Baltimore, then in Towson and finally in Newport News, Va.

Born in Annapolis, he was a graduate of City College, where he had been a member of the cross country team. He ran races ranging from several miles in length to marathons and was a member of the Cross Country Club and the White Horse Club.

In the 1930s, he won a 10,000 meter South Atlantic Association championship race in Baltimore, narrowly defeating William Agee, who won many races in the area and ran in the marathon at the 1928 Olympics.

He held several offices during his 51 years in the Knights of Pythias and was a member of the Liberty Lodge of the Masons.

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